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Artikel-artikel mengenai 1960s

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President John F. Kennnedy personally bid the first Peace Corps volunteers farewell. AP Photo/William J. Smith

How the US government sold the Peace Corps to the American public

The agency's earliest ad campaigns emphasized youthful idealism, patriotism and travel opportunities. That was an easier sell than urging Americans to enlist in an anti-communist operation.
College yearbook editors in the 1960s juxtaposed pictures of traditional campus activities, such as Greek Life, alongside images of protests and marches. The Kentuckian, 1968

Beyond blackface: How college yearbooks captured protest and change

Recent blackface scandals that involve college yearbooks have overshadowed how yearbooks also chronicled important turning points in the history of US higher education, a historian argues.
On Dec. 23, 1969, John Lennon and Yoko Ono went to Parliament Hill in Ottawa to meet Pierre Trudeau. The Canadian prime minister was the only world leader to meet with the peace activists. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Peter Bregg)

50 years ago, John and Yoko came to Canada to give peace a chance

John Lennon and Yoko Ono visited Canada on a peace mission: They met with leaders and asked difficult questions, relevant today. How do we effectively protest against social injustices and war?
Students for a Democratic Society was the largest – and arguably most successful – student activist organization in U.S. history. S.Sgt. Albert R. Simpson, Department of Defense / via Wikimedia

What was the protest group Students for a Democratic Society? 5 questions answered

Student protest has been in the political spotlight since Trump's election. Todd Gitlin, former president of Students for a Democratic Society, shares his perspective on protest in the 60s and now.

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