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Artikel-artikel mengenai Women's suffrage

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Palestinian artists draw a mural of hunger striker Hisham Abu Hawash. MOHAMMED ABED/AFP via Getty Images

Inmates’ hunger strikes take powerful stands against injustice

The power of the hunger strike lies in its utter simplicity. Anyone can choose to forego eating, even when living under extremely restricted conditions.
Why did she do all the work while Santa got all the glory? What would happen if she delivered the toys? Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

How Mrs. Claus embodied 19th-century debates about women’s rights

Many early stories praise her work ethic and devotion. But with Mrs. Claus usually hitting the North Pole’s glass ceiling, some writers started to push back.
Women protested outside the White House in 1917, seeking the right to vote. Harris & Ewing via Library of Congress

Deaf women fought for the right to vote

Despite harsh, discriminatory conditions, low pay and lack of appreciation, deaf women have fought with brilliance and dedication for personal and professional recognition, including the right to vote.
Congress had very few women members back in 1960, and just one woman of color: Representative Patsy Mink of Hawaii. Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images)

Patsy Takemoto Mink blazed the trail for Kamala Harris – not famous white woman Susan B. Anthony

Mink, the first woman of color in Congress, brought a racially and historically aware brand of feminism into lawmaking and ran for president in 1972. But women’s history largely overlooks her.
These boys working in a Georgia cotton mill were photographed in 1909. Lewis Hine/The National Child Labor Committee Collection via Library of Congress

Abolishing child labor took the specter of ‘white slavery’ and the job market’s near collapse during the Great Depression

More than a fifth of US children were working in 1900, and many Americans saw nothing wrong with that. It took decades of activism and court battles plus economic upheaval to change course.
Catherine Hay Thomson went undercover as an assistant nurse for her series on conditions at Melbourne Hospital. A. J. Campbell Collection/National Library of Australia

Hidden women of history: Catherine Hay Thomson, the Australian undercover journalist who went inside asylums and hospitals

A passionate crusader for the rights of women and children, Catherine Hay Thomson went undercover to investigate their treatment in public institutions and testified before a Royal Commission.
After winning the right to vote in 1893, New Zealand’s suffragists kept up the battle, but the unity found in rallying around the major cause had receded. Jim Henderson/Wikimedia Commons

NZ was first to grant women the vote in 1893, but then took 26 years to let them stand for parliament

New Zealand was the first nation to grant women the vote in 1893, but during the pre-war years enduring prejudice against women in politics outweighed any support for women to stand for parliament
Kamala Harris wore white for a reason during her victory speech. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

How white became the color of suffrage

Being the media-savvy women that they were, suffragists realized they needed to come up with a meaningful, recognizable brand.
Independent Kerryn Phelps’s roll call of “decency, integrity, humanity” harked back to the women who fought hard for female enfranchisement in the early 20th century. AAP/Chris Pavlich

More than a century on, the battle fought by Australia’s suffragists is yet to be won

The early suffragists would be rolling in their graves to know that women joining the ranks of parliamentarians barely changed their male colleagues’ outlook and demeanour at all.

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