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International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI)

The International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) provides research-based policy solutions to sustainably reduce poverty and end hunger and malnutrition in developing countries. Established in 1975, IFPRI currently has more than 600 employees working in over 50 countries. It is a research center of the CGIAR Consortium, a worldwide partnership engaged in agricultural research for development.

Vision and Mission

IFPRI’s vision is a world free of hunger and malnutrition. Its mission is to provide research-based policy solutions that sustainably reduce poverty and end hunger and malnutrition.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 21 articles

Phone surveys were used to gather data in Ethiopia. Photo by EDUARDO SOTERAS/AFP via Getty Images

What people from war-torn Tigray told us about the state of their lives amid the war

Our work highlights the potential of phone surveys to monitor active and large-scale conflicts.
Widespread protests have followed changes in the subsidised price of Baladi bread, a traditional Sudanese flatbread. Photo by MUJAHED SHARAF AL-DEEN SATI/AFP via Getty Images

Russia-Ukraine conflict is driving up wheat prices: this could fuel instability in Sudan

Wheat and bread play a central role for food security and political stability in Sudan.
Egyptian Prime Minister Mostafa Madbouly pledged to keep food prices in the fair range amid the ongoing conflict between Russia and Ukraine. Photo by Ahmed Gomaa/Xinhua via Getty Images

Russia-Ukraine crisis poses a serious threat to Egypt – the world’s largest wheat importer

Egypt is already feeling the impact of the war, which has led to recent cancellation of tenders due to lack of offers, in particular from Ukraine and Russia.
Might the 2021 Zambian elections usher in another period of economic growth? Salim Dawood/AFP via Getty Images

Four priorities for Zambia after the 2021 elections

Whoever wins the elections will face two key challenges: reviving the country’s democratic credentials and stimulating the economy.
A health worker administers an injection to a child below the age of one year during a routine immunisation at a health center in Kampala, Uganda. Xinhua/Nicholas Kajoba via Getty Images

Low trust in authorities affects vaccine uptake: evidence from 22 African countries

Even where vaccines are available, one barrier to progress is vaccine hesitancy: the reluctance or refusal to vaccinate.
Grootvlei, Snake Park, an impoverished suburb on the fringe of one of the biggest mine dumps in Soweto, Johannesburg. Poor people have been hit hardest by the fallout of COVID-19. Mujahid Safodien/AFP via Getty Images

Who has been hit hardest by South Africa’s lockdown? We found some answers

The net effect is that the shocks are most severe on poorer, more vulnerable households.
Informal food trade represents a critical source of employment and food security for the urban poor. Nic Bothma/EPA

Informal traders in African cities are being used as political pawns

By better understanding the politics and governance of African cities and variations across cities, we can identify feasible opportunities to improve informal traders’ livelihoods.
It’s not that people in poorer countries want to eat unhealthily - but cost is a huge factor. Aleksandar Todorovic/Shutterstock.com/Editorial use only

Why living in a poor country means you have bad food choices

The fact that relative food prices differ so markedly and so systematically provides a very strong rationale for nutrition-focused food policies.
Africa has focused on tackling undernutrition caused by low calorie diets. IFPRI

Seven African countries show how the battle against malnutrition can be won

Policy choices made by Senegal, Ghana, Rwanda, Angola, Cameroon, Ethiopia and Togo over the past 15 years have led to significant reductions in child undernourishment.
A Zambian opposition protester is arrested during a past election: Instances of serious violence have increased dramatically this time around. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Zambia’s 2016 elections: democracy hovering on the precipice

As Zambia prepares to go to the polls again the entire party system is in flux, electoral violence has been worryingly frequent and the country’s democratic credentials are increasingly in doubt
A Malawian mother and her child in front of maize harvested in Lilongwe. A fertiliser programme has increased crop yields. Reuters/Siphiwe Sibeko

Malawi’s farm subsidy benefits the poor but doesn’t come cheap

Malawi’s large-scale subsidy for farmers has resulted in higher maize production, lower food prices and higher wages. But this has come at significant costs.

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