Royal Holloway

Royal Holloway is one of the UK’s leading research-intensive universities, with 19 academic departments spanning the arts and humanities, sciences, social sciences, management and economics.

The university is ranked 17th in the UK, 47th in Europe, and 118th in the world by the Times Higher Education World University Rankings for 2014. This ranks Royal Holloway, or the College as it is known, in the top 1% of all higher education institutions worldwide.

The most recent REF confirmed that Royal Holloway sits within the top 25 per cent of universities in the UK for research which is rated ‘world-leading’ or ‘internationally excellent’.

In the 2015 National Student Survey (NSS) survey, Royal Holloway achieved an overall satisfaction rate of 89%, 3% above the national average, making it top among the University of London institutions and the larger universities in London.

Royal Holloway offers a genuine community experience, one that inspires individuals to succeed. Its 135 acre campus is located in Egham, 40 minutes by train from central London. The Egham campus was established by Thomas Holloway, a Victorian entrepreneur, philanthropist and social reformer. He was also responsible for building the College’s Grade 1 listed Founder’s Building.

Royal Holloway College was officially opened in 1886 by Queen Victoria, and became a member the University of London in 1900. It merged with Bedford College in 1985 to become Royal Holloway, University of London.

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The 1976 memorial at the Babi Yar massacre site only recognised Soviet victims, despite the killing of more than 30,000 Jewish people. In 1991 a Jewish memorial was installed nearby. Jennifer Boyer/Flickr

Decoding the music masterpieces: Shostakovich’s Babi Yar

On September 29 1941, Nazis murdered more than 30,000 Jews in a ravine outside Kiev. Dmitri Shostakovich's 13th Symphony, Babi Yar, is a damning critique of the Soviet Union's lack of recognition of the massacre, and a condemnation of Stalinism.
French armed forces prepare aid and assistance to French territories in the Caribbean. Guillaume Cabre/Defense Armee de Terre

Hurricane Irma’s devastation of Caribbean territories piles pressure on strained relationship with UK

The aid and assistance Britain's Caribbean territories will need to rebuild will make highlight the fault lines in the relationship between Westminster and its former colonies.

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