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Texas State University

Founded 1899 to prepare the best teachers in the Lone Star State, Texas State University has a legacy of preparing students to make an impact in the world. Texas State’s 38,000 students choose from more than 200 bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees at our San Marcos and Round Rock campuses. As a Hispanic-Serving Institution, our community reflects the variety and diversity of Texas. We are a top destination for transfer students, and we are especially dedicated to seeing our first-generation college students reach their full academic potential. Texas State has been named among the nation’s best institutions by both U.S. News and World Report and the Princeton Review.

Texas State is an Emerging Research University with specialties in water resource management and conservation, forensic anthropology, education and healthcare. With 562 faculty research projects and $64.6 million in research and development expenditures in FY 2019, Texas State is committed to applied research that can change the world. Our faculty and students are generating new knowledge, catalyzing ideas into reality, and pushing the boundaries in every discipline.

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People volunteer at a Native Alaskan voting station on Nov. 2, 2022 in Anchorage. Spencer Platt/Getty Images

What’s at stake this Election Day – 7 essential reads

Voter demographics and policy priorities are two recurrent, big issues on Election Day – but shifts in election administration and voting laws are new challenges influencing the midterms.
Louis Pasteur was a pioneer in chemistry, microbiology, immunology and vaccinology. pictore/DigitalVision Vectors via Getty Images

Louis Pasteur’s scientific discoveries in the 19th century revolutionized medicine and continue to save the lives of millions today

On World Rabies Day – which is also the anniversary of French microbiologist Louis Pasteur’s death – a virologist reflects on the achievements of this visionary scientist.
U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken speaks during the 2022 Review Conference of the Parties to the Treaty on the Nonproliferation of Nuclear Weapons at the United Nations on Aug. 1, 2022. Angela Weiss/AFP via Getty Images

Why are nuclear weapons so hard to get rid of? Because they’re tied up in nuclear countries’ sense of right and wrong

Policymakers often think of their decisions about nuclear weapons as moral, a nuclear ethicist explains – which is key to understanding their motives.
Russian Security Council Secretary Nikolai Patrushev watches the Victory Day military parade at Red Square in central Moscow on May 9, 2022. Kirill Kudryavtsev/AFP via Getty Images

As one of Vladimir Putin’s closest advisers on Ukraine, Nicolai Patrushev spreads disinformation and outlandish conspiracy theories

As Russia’s assault slogs on in Ukraine, one of Vladimir Putin’s long-standing friends has considerable influence over the Russian president. His name is Nicolai Patrushev.
The cognitive difficulties that accompany mental health disorders can potentially lead to misdiagnoses and improper treatment. Elva Etienne/Moment via Getty Images

Mental health problems come with an added ‘cost’ of poorer cognitive function – a neuropsychologist explains

While only about 20% of people would qualify for a formal diagnosis of a mental disorder, more than 60% express symptoms of those disorders – and those symptoms can lead to cognitive difficulties.
Some Bitcoin evangelists see the currency as an answer to problems that plague society. mustafa akman/iStock via Getty Images

Why are people calling Bitcoin a religion?

With mantras, a mysterious founder and promises of societal salvation, there are echoes of religious traditions in the cryptocurrency.

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