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Knowing what to say to someone who has lost a loved one by suicide can help survivors. Monkey Business Images/www.shutterstock.com

Mourning death by suicide: How you can provide support for the bereaved

Survivors of those who have died by suicide have special needs that many people do not quite understand. An expert in grief offers ways to be a helpful, healing presence and avoid saying things that will hurt.
Will the yellow warbler survive a changing climate? By Steve Byland/shutterstock.com

Can this bird adapt to a warmer climate? Read the genes to find out

As the climate warms, some species will not be able to evolve fast enough to adapt to the new conditions. Rachael Bay examined DNA for clues as to which yellow warblers were most vulnerable.
A woman holds a Syrian flag during a protest against air strikes on Syria in Baghdad, Iraq on April 15, 2018. REUTERS/Thaier Al-Sudani

US airstrikes in Syria nothing more than theater

Are air strikes really a way to hold the Syrian regime responsible for its alleged atrocities against humanity? History says no.
A plate of fattening food is harder for some people to resist than others. Milan Gordic/Shutterstock.com

What thin people don’t understand about dieting

Dieting is a setup. The act of dieting causes physiological changes that make it hard to continue dieting successfully. Here's how the body fights back when some people try to lose weight.
Supporters of the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments during a rally Saturday, Dec. 2, 2017 in Salt Lake City. AP Photo/Rick Bowmer

President Trump’s national monument rollback is illegal and likely to be reversed in court

President Trump signed an order on Dec. 4 to drastically reduce the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments. Four legal experts explain why this action is likely to be reversed.
Police work near a damaged Home Depot truck on Nov. 1, 2017, after a motorist drove onto a bike path near the World Trade Center memorial. AP Photo/Andres Kudacki

What draws ‘lone wolves’ to the Islamic State?

Sayfullo Saipov, the suspect in the Manhattan bike path attack, wasn't a devout Muslim. He cursed and came late to prayers. A terrorism expert explains why such a man may want to be a martyr.
Saudi Arabia’s King Salman bin Abdulaziz Al Saud on Oct. 5, 2017. AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin

Why is Saudi Arabia suddenly so paranoid?

When it comes to foreign policy, Saudi Arabia has recently become far more aggressive. A historian of the modern Middle East sees three possible causes for the shift.
A makeshift memorial to the victims of the terrorist attack in Barcelona. Police killed five men August 18 believed to have been involved. AP Photo/Manu Fernandez

Are Islamic State recruits more street gang members than zealots?

With terrorists striking again in Spain and in Finland, one cannot help but ask -- again -- why people want to follow the Islamic State. Some new theories are emerging.
The sun rises behind the remains of a New Jersey roller coaster destroyed by Hurricane Sandy. AP Photo/Mel Evans

New data set explores 90 years of natural disasters in the US

As the rich move away from disaster-prone areas, the poor may be left behind.

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