University of Florida

The University of Florida (UF) is a major, public, comprehensive, land-grant, research university. The state’s oldest and most comprehensive university, UF is among the nation’s most academically diverse public universities.

UF has a long history of established programs in international education, research and service. It is one of only 17 public, land-grant universities that belongs to the Association of American Universities.

In 1853, the state-funded East Florida Seminary took over the Kingsbury Academy in Ocala. The seminary moved to Gainesville in the 1860s and later was consolidated with the state’s land-grant Florida Agricultural College, then in Lake City. In 1905, by legislative action, the college became a university and was moved to Gainesville. Classes first met with 102 students on the present site on Sept. 26, 1906. UF officially opened its doors to women in 1947. With more than 50,000 students, UF is now one of the largest universities in the nation.

UF has a 2,000-acre campus and more than 900 buildings (including 170 with classrooms and laboratories). The northeast corner of campus is listed as a Historic District on the National Register of Historic Places. The UF residence halls have a total capacity of some 7,500 students and the five family housing villages house more than 1,000 married and graduate students.

UF’s extensive capital improvement program has resulted in facilities ideal for 21st century academics and research, including the Health Professions, Nursing and Pharmacy Building; the Cancer and Genetics Research Center; the new Biomedical Sciences Building; and William R. Hough Hall, which houses the Hough Graduate School of Business. Overall, the university’s current facilities have a book value of more than $1 billion and a replacement value of $2 billion.

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Baltimore Ravens tight end Konrad Reuland sat on the sidelines of a preseason game in September 2015 against the Atlanta Falcons. AP Photo/Brynn Anderson

Anniversary of Konrad Reuland tragedy reminds us of the toll of brain aneurysms

Konrad Reuland's death shocked sports fans and, famously, gave new life to baseball Hall of Famer Rod Carew. But how is it that a young athlete in top shape could suddenly develop a deadly condition?
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The two obstacles that are holding back Alzheimer’s research

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Researchers find pathological signs of Alzheimer’s in dolphins, whose brains are much like humans’

Researchers have found evidence of the same brain pathologies in dolphins that are present in the brains of humans who died with Alzheimer's. What might this suggest about Alzheimer's in humans?
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Measuring the implicit biases we may not even be aware we have

Prejudice and stereotypes are part of why social inequality persists. Social scientists use tests to measure the implicit biases people harbor and see how much they relate to actions.
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How Columbus, of all people, became a national symbol

An anthropologist tells the story of how Columbus actually came close to falling into historical obscurity, until American hubris got in the way.
Mohandas K. Gandhi during a prayer meeting on Jan. 22, 1948. AP Photo/File

What Gandhi can teach today’s protesters

For Gandhi, whose birth anniversary is Monday, Oct. 2, nonviolent resistance meant placing one's own body in harm’s way to expose social injustices, which made it a powerful political tool.
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How the anal cancer epidemic in gay and bi HIV-positive men can be prevented

A new study shows that anal cancer, caused by the virus HPV, can be successfully fought in HIV-positive men by timely treatment and HPV vaccination of lesions that may ultimately lead to cancer.
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Should the US put power lines underground?

Would putting power lines underground avoid hurricanes knocking out electricity service for millions of people? The answer is not as straightforward as it seems.
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Parkinson’s disease: New drugs and treatments, but where are the doctors?

Research has yielded new insights into Parkinson's disease, and treatments are expanding. But a shortage of doctors trained in the disease leaves a gap in care.
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Explaining the Muslim pilgrimage of hajj

Each year, Muslims from all over the world go on a pilgrimage to the holy city of Mecca in Saudi Arabia, known as hajj. A scholar explains its spiritual significance.

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