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University of Guelph

The University of Guelph is ranked as one of Canada’s top comprehensive universities because of our commitment to student learning and innovative research. We are dedicated to cultivating the essentials for our quality of life - water, food, environment, animal and human health, community, commerce, culture and learning. The University community also shares a profound sense of social responsibility, an obligation to address global issues and a concern for international development.

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Displaying 241 - 260 of 281 articles

Research shows that Instagram photos tagged with #eatingdisorderrecovery tend to feature thin, young, white, women. They also show stylized versions of food, reflecting a certain class status and engagement with “foodie” cultures. (Shutterstock)

Thin, white, female: How people document eating disorder recovery on Instagram

Instagram can offer a supportive online community to people recovering from eating disorders. It can also reinforce stereotypes of eating disordered bodies.
Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, right, and Mexico’s Secretary of Economy Ildefonso Guajardo Villarrea, deliver statements to the media during the sixth round of negotiations for a new North American Free Trade Agreement in Montreal in January 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

What if Trump kills NAFTA? Remedies for Canada and Mexico

Donald Trump has described NAFTA as the worst trade deal ever signed by the United States. As NAFTA talks continue, here's what Canada and Mexico can do if the unthinkable happens.
Dr. Cindy Blackstock, executive director of the First Nations Child and Family Caring Society, has called on the federal government to stop its chronic underfunding of services for Indigenous children. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Canada guilty of forging crisis in Indigenous foster care

No project for reconciliation can succeed unless the federal and provincial governments roll back their power and create space for Indigenous control over their own self-determining futures.
Sockeye salmon need strong hearts to migrate long distances. An oil spill could hurt their survival. (AP Photo/Gary Stewart, File)

The Kinder Morgan pipeline and Pacific salmon: Red fish, black gold

Pacific salmon are ingrained in the culture and economy of Canada. They are also a key link between ocean and land. But what happens if a pipeline failure contaminates their habitat?
Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) used in medical devices and for growing plants, like potatoes seen here, are used by NASA to grow plants in space. The U.S. space agency plans to grow food on future spacecraft and on other planets as a food supplement for astronauts. NASA

Improving upon the sun: LED lights fuel plant growth in space

LED lights can actually improve upon the sun and help grow plants in space. A Canadian team of researchers is helping to refine and perfect LED technology.
Chris Stevens, owner of Kaboom Chicken restaurant in Toronto, hands an order to a customer in December. Ontario’s new $14 per hour minimum wage took effect Jan. 1 and Stevens has already taken steps to ensure his restaurant can afford the added expense. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

Higher prices, reduced hours: Restaurants & minimum wage hikes

Minimum wages increases in jurisdictions across North America could have a big impact on the restaurant industry. Here's how restaurants are trying to adapt.
Health concerns about red meat consumption, as well as the environmental impact of meat production, have fuelled an increased demand in plant-based proteins among Canadians. These calves are shown on the Grazed Right cattle ranch near Black Diamond, Alta., in 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Less meat, more choice: A look at key food issues in 2018

Canadians are increasingly invested in their food -- where it comes from, how it's produced, and whether it's healthy. Here are some predicted food trends for 2018.
Non-compliance at mealtimes can be stressful for parents. However, research shows that independence at mealtimes is completely appropriate for children as they learn to discriminate based on newly recognized qualities of foods such as taste, texture, presentation and familiarity. (Shutterstock)

Is your child a picky eater? Five ways to fun and healthy mealtimes

A picky eater need not ruin dinner and drive parents crazy. Two nutrition experts offer simple strategies for happier and healthier family mealtimes.
Some restaurant-owners are grappling with abolishing tipping. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

With the holidays upon us, is it time to end tipping?

Restaurant tipping came to North America in the early 20th century and has become well-established here even as the practice is less common in the U.K. and Europe. Is it time to rethink it?
A real estate sold sign hangs in front of a west-end Toronto property. Canada’s newly announced housing strategy contains scant measures to help first-time buyers in pricey markets. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graeme Roy

No help for would-be homeowners in Canada’s new housing strategy

Canada's National Housing Strategy leaves a large segment of the population that must find a way to afford housing in the private market. More initiatives are needed to help first-time home buyers.
Canadian grocery chains are recognizing the potential for growth in online shopping and delivery, but Canadians are slow to embrace the service. (Shutterstock)

Why Canada is wary of online grocery shopping

Online grocery shopping is a potential growth area for Canadian grocery chains. Yet Canadians are proving to be lukewarm about buying groceries online, preferring to shop in stores.
Cannabis plant strains in jars in MediJean’s Health Canada-licensed tissue culture development lab are kept for research as manager Abdul Ahad works in the Richmond, B.C., facility, in this 2014 file photo. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck)

How to grow cannabis? With modern science and technology

The legal cannabis industry will have to develop scientific research and evidence based growth methods and technology if it is to succeed against the secretive illicit industry.
This sculpture in London commemorates Nelson Mandela, who set up the African National Congress’ armed wing, Umkhonto we Sizwe (Spear of the Nation), in 1961 when he lost hope that passive and non-violent resistance to the apartheid government would bear fruit. (Creative Commons)

Why conflict can be necessary to bring about justice

Seeking justice, not peace, in our world changes the conversation about conflict. Conflict has proven integral to achieving a more equitable and secure society.
For many parents, it’s the haul of gummy worms, licorice, chocolate bars and other high-sugar candies that their kids bring home – not the ghouls and zombies – that is terrifying about Halloween. (Shutterstock)

How to avoid a Halloween sugar disaster

Halloween is upon us, and the sugar is horrible for your kids' teeth and health. But fear not -- there are things parents can do to lessen the impact of the candy binge.
As North America’s opioid crisis worsens, schools across Canada are purchasing naloxone anti-overdose kits. Research suggests that risks of opioid addiction could also be addressed through attention to children’s nutrition. (Shutterstock)

Sugar in the diet may increase risks of opioid addiction

High fructose corn syrup in food and drinks has long been linked to rising rates of child and teen obesity. New evidence suggests it increases the risks of opioid addiction and overdose too.
122 million of 155 million stunted children live in conflict countries. (Piyaset/Shutterstock.com)

Conflict and climate change lead to a rise in global hunger

Development officials have been cautiously optimistic that we were on our way to eradicating hunger. But a recent report by the UN shows a surge in global hunger due to conflict and climate change.
A trade official from the United States walks past a sign Monday where Canadian, American and Mexican officials are holding North American free trade talks in Ottawa. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

NAFTA talks: Seeing the benefits through the bluster

There's been a lot of rhetoric in the air about the fate of NAFTA, especially from the U.S. president. But its demise is extremely unlikely.

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