University of Maryland

The University of Maryland, College Park is the state’s flagship university and one of the nation’s preeminent public research universities. A global leader in research, entrepreneurship and innovation, the university is home to more than 37,000 students, 9,000 faculty and staff, and 250 academic programs. Its faculty includes three Nobel laureates, three Pulitzer Prize winners, 56 members of the national academies and scores of Fulbright scholars. The institution has a $1.9 billion operating budget, and secures $560 million annually in external research funding.

The University of Maryland, College Park is ranked No. 20 among public universities and No. 25 for most innovative schools by U.S. News & World Report, as well as No. 14 among public universities by Forbes. According to The Princeton Review and Entrepreneur Magazine, UMD is ranked No. 10 overall for undergraduate entrepreneurship programs. The university is recognized for its diversity, with underrepresented students comprising one-fourth of the student population. For more information about the University of Maryland, College Park, visit www.umd.edu.

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A Syrian family loads their belongings as they evacuate an informal refugee camp in Deir Al-Ahmar, east Lebanon, June 9, 2019. AP/Hussein Malla

Are Syrian refugees a danger to the West?

Will Syrian religious extremists migrate to the West as refugees in need – and then do harm? A team of researchers surveyed Syrian refugees in Lebanon, Jordan and Turkey to find out the answer.
Hispanic voters are not a monolith. Baiterek Media/shutterstock.com

How Hispanics really feel about Trump

Hispanics oppose Trump's immigration policies in larger numbers than the rest of the population. But their opinions are divided sharply across partisan lines.
‘Design for a giant crossbow.’ Leonardo da Vinci

Leonardo joined art with engineering

As Leonardo da Vinci found centuries ago, scholars of art, design, engineering and science can work together for mutual benefit.
The aftermath of a 2018 attack by the Taliban in Ghazni city, Afghanistan. Will terrorist attacks like this one be as common in 2019? Reuters/Mustafa Andaleb

Will terrorism continue to decline in 2019?

Terrorist attacks and fatalities peaked in 2014, and have been on the decline since then.
From left to right: Toya Tolson, Shawnte’ Spriggs, Sophia Harrison, Marcella Wright and Deborah Dyson. These women are aging with HIV, sometimes with other diseases and always with other challenges. Aamir Khuller

African-American women with HIV often overlooked, under-supported

More people than ever are living with HIV, but people may overlook the fact that many of these long-term survivors are African-American women. They face unique social and health challenges.
‘Say cheese so I can show all my friends how cute you are – and unwittingly show corporations your age, race and gender!’ Fancy Studio/Shutterstock.com

The real problem with posting about your kids online

Parents have engaged in forms of 'sharenting' for generations. The digital age has complicated things, but while critics make some valid points, they're not seeing the forest for the trees.
They’re small and well-connected, but how safe are ‘internet of things’ devices? BeeBright/Shutterstock.com

The quiet threat inside ‘internet of things’ devices

As the number of 'internet of things' devices expands rapidly, so do security vulnerabilities to homes, businesses, governments and the internet as as whole.
Students prep for the SAT at a test prep center in New York City. Kaplan Test Prep

Test prep is a rite of passage for many Asian-Americans

Test prep is a prominent feature in Asian-American communities, which helps explain recent gains that Asian-Americans made in the SAT and ACT college entrance exams, a higher education scholar argues.

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