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University of Massachusetts Boston

The University of Massachusetts Boston is nationally recognized as a model of excellence for urban public universities. The scenic waterfront campus, with easy access to downtown Boston, is located next to the John F. Kennedy Library and Presidential Museum and future home to the Edward M. Kennedy Institute for the United States Senate.

Part of the UMass system, UMass Boston combines a small-college experience with the vast resources of a major research university. With a 16:1 student-to-faculty ratio, students easily interact with professors because most teaching occurs in small class sizes. Ninety-three percent of full-time faculty hold the highest degree in their fields.

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Planting paddy saplings in Patiala, India. Three-quarters of Indian farmers are women, but most don’t own their land. Bharat Bhushan/Hindustan Times via Getty Images

Women grow as much as 80% of India’s food – but its new farm laws overlook their struggles

Most Indian farmers are women. But few own their land, and gender inequality limits their access to markets. These issues won't be fixed by recent agricultural reforms; in fact, they may get worse.
U.S. President Donald Trump greets Russian President Vladimir Putin during their bilateral meeting in Osaka, Japan, June, 28, 2019. Mikhail Svetlov/Getty Images

President Trump’s use of the authoritarian playbook will have lasting consequences

Throughout his presidency, Donald Trump has exposed the fragility of democratic institutions, mirroring a global trend in authoritarianism, and that will have a lasting effect on the United States.
A Guatemalan immigrant tries to log on to his Chromebook while remote learning in Stamford, Connecticut. John Moore/Getty Images

For many immigrant students, remote learning during COVID-19 comes with more hurdles

Immigrant students often have work commitments outside class, and they may need additional language support. Giving them equal access to technology during remote learning might not be enough.
Protesters hold signs outside women’s fashion designer Eudon Choi in London during Fashion Week in 2017. Elena Rostenova/www.shutterstock.com

Python skin jackets and elephant leather boots: How wealthy Western nations help drive the global wildlife trade

The COVID-19 pandemic has cast a harsh light on global commerce in wildlife. But many accounts focus on demand from Asia, ignoring the role of US and European consumers.
A sense of normalcy is returning to South Korea but the U.S. lacks the testing capacity and contact tracing system the country relies on. AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon

How South Korea flattened the coronavirus curve with technology

In addition to testing and special facilities for COVID-19 patients, the country's government-run tracking system allows the health care system to identify infected people and their contacts.
The first Earth Day in 1972 spurred other countries to support global environmental action. Callista Images/Getty

The first Earth Day was a shot heard around the world

April 22, 2020 is the 50th anniversary of Earth Day, which catalyzed action to protect the environment not just in the US but internationally.
Sens. Elizabeth Warren and Kamala Harris are among the 2020 presidential hopefuls in favor of reparations. AP Photo/David J. Phillip

Reparations are essential to eliminating the substantial wealth gap between black and white Americans

Several presidential hopefuls have offered proposals to close the racial wealth gap, from baby bonds to reparations. A simulation suggests policies short of direct aid to blacks won't do the trick.
An all-renewable grid will mean more electricity and more transmission lines. Russ Allison Loar/flickr

How to have an all-renewable electric grid

We have all the technologies needed to make the electric grid run on renewables and lower pollution. What are they and what are the barriers to adopting them widely?
Average Walmart workers make twice the federal minimum wage but may still qualify for public benefits. AP Photo/Mark Lennihan

Getting poorer while working harder: The ‘cliff effect’

Stressing out about potentially losing benefits can prolong financial instability. Solving this problem will help low-paid workers and everyone else.

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