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University of Missouri-Columbia

The University of Missouri is a public research university located in the state of Missouri. In 1839 the university was founded in Columbia, Missouri, as the first public institution of higher education west of the Mississippi River. The largest university in Missouri, MU enrolls 34,616 students in 20 academic colleges in the 2013–14 year. The university is the flagship of the University of Missouri System which maintains campuses in Rolla, Kansas City and St. Louis.

MU is one of the nation’s top-tier R1 institutions, and one of 34 public universities to be members of the Association of American Universities and the only one in Missouri. There are more than 270,000 MU alumni living worldwide, with almost one half continuing to reside in Missouri. The University of Missouri was ranked 97th in the 2014 U.S. News & World Report among the national universities, steady from the previous year.

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U.S. Reps. Bennie Thompson and Liz Cheney, chair and vice chair of the committee investigating the Capitol insurrection, after voting to hold Steve Bannon in criminal contempt. Alex Wong/Getty Images

Steve Bannon is held in criminal contempt of Congress, pushing key question over presidential power to the courts

Donald Trump asked his former presidential aides not to testify before a congressional committee investigating the Jan. 6 Capitol insurrection – testing the limits of congressional oversight.
When asked how she wanted to be remembered, Tammy Faye replied, “My eyelashes and my walk with the Lord.” John Storey/Getty Images

Underneath all the makeup, who was the real Tammy Faye?

The subject of a new biopic, Tammy Faye was a televangelist icon. But she also represented another side of the evangelical coin – one that was big-hearted, vulnerable and accepting.
The Richardson Independent School District in Texas is among the many districts across the state defying the governor’s mask mandate ban to require masks for students. AP Photo/LM Otero

Who has the power to say kids do or don’t have to wear masks in school – the governor or the school district? It’s not clear

If it sounds like the law is all over the place on school mask mandates, that’s because it is. The nation’s schools are subject to a complex web of local, state and federal laws.
Grindr allows for anonymity in a way that other dating apps do not. Martin Bureau/AFP via Getty Images

How gay men justify their racism on Grindr

When gay men were confronted about writing ‘no Blacks’ or ‘no Latinos’ on their profiles, many of them became defensive.
People who want to restrict guns have a point, but so do people who say those laws make little difference in mass shootings. George Frey/AFP via Getty Images

In gun debate, both sides have evidence to back them up

Stricter gun control laws may make mass shootings slightly less common, but other policies may work better to prevent mass shooting deaths.
Not all gay people enjoy big cities, but pop culture has little to say about rural LGBTQ life. Ruaridh Connellan / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

Queer in the country: Why some LGBTQ Americans prefer rural life to urban ‘gayborhoods’

Stereotypically, gay, queer and trans kids flee small towns to find acceptance in big, diverse cities like New York or Chicago. But evidence shows many will eventually return to rural areas.
Volunteers prepare boxes at the Greater Boston Food Bank on Oct. 1, 2020. Iaritza Menjivar, The Washington Post via Getty Images

Corporate concentration in the US food system makes food more expensive and less accessible for many Americans

Food production in the US is heavily concentrated in the hands of a small number of large agribusiness companies. That’s been good for shareholders, but not for consumers.
In a photo from 2004, Illinois state Sen. Barack Obama, right, speaks with a fellow legislator on the floor of the state Senate chamber. AP photo/Randy Squires

Obama book offers key insight about how laws really get made

Many former legislators offer accounts of their service – but few analyze the institutions in which they served.
A massive shift to mail-in voting will be hard for many of the state and local officials who run elections. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images

Mail-in voting’s potential problems only begin at the post office – an underfunded, underprepared decentralized system could be trouble

To carry out an election by mail, hundreds of thousands of state and local offices and employees across the US must make sure that ballots are processed in a fair, consistent and timely manner.
President Donald Trump makes a statement to the press in the Rose Garden about restoring “law and order” in the wake of protests. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Can the president really order the military to occupy US cities and states?

President Trump has warned that he will send the military into states to curb protests. Is Trump’s warning bluster? Or does the president have the authority to send the military into American cities?
On April 13, the president said he had the authority to order the states to reopen the economy. Getty/Jabin Botsford/The Washington Post

Trump versus the states: What federalism means for the coronavirus response

Throughout the coronavirus crisis, President Trump has made inconsistent statements about who is responsible for key aspects of the nation’s response to the pandemic. The Constitution has the answer.
Health care workers at Lake Regional Hospital in Osage Beach, Missouri, wear face shields donated by students from Camdenton High School in Camdenton, Missouri. Provided courtesy of Camdenton High School

Students fight pandemic – and get real-world experience – by using 3D printers to make face shields

The COVID-19 outbreak presents many opportunities for students to develop needed solutions to real-life problems, says a researcher overseeing school project to produce personal protective equipment.

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