University of South Australia

Founded in 1991, the University of South Australia is committed to educating professionals, creating and applying knowledge, engaging communities, maintaining cultural diversity among its staff and students, and providing equitable access to education.

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The right side of the ‘latte line’ in Sydney, looking across Paddington towards Bondi Junction and the eastern suburbs. R. Freestone

Australian cities and their metropolitan plans still seem to be parallel universes

The State of Australian Cities Conference begins in Adelaide today. In major cities across the nation, there's a stark contrast between lofty planning goals and the sprawling reality on the ground.
All brain tumours are associated with significant sickness and death, even if they are benign. from shutterstock.com

Three charts on: brain cancer in Australia

Why hasn't there been an improvement in survival in the last 30 years for patients with brain cancers?
BMW recently opened a factory for aging workers in southern Germany. Reuters

Keeping mature-age workers on the job

Employers who cater for their ageing workforce will get better staff productivity and engagement levels
Staying alert and safe on the night shift not only affects workers’ health, but the health and safety of the people around them. from www.shutterstock.com

Power naps and meals don’t always help shift workers make it through the night

Taking a power nap on a night shift can leave you feeling groggy. And eating a large meal can reduce your alertness. So, what's a tired shift worker to do to make it through the night?
Bone is a dynamic tissue that is continually broken down and reformed throughout life. from shutterstock.com

Both men and women need strong bones, but their skeletons grow differently across ages

Fracture risk is higher in older women than men, but in adolescence the reverse is true. These differences mean our approach to managing bone health for men and women changes across the ages.
Butterfly wings, like those of the monarch butterfly, have inspired scientists to create “structural colours”. tea maeklong/Shutterstock

Explainer: how scientists invent new colours

Scientists continue to invent new colours for new applications thanks to nanoscale structures.
Our national wellbeing probably peaked with Australia’s population at roughly 15 million in the 1970s, when this photo was taken in Hunters Hill, Sydney. John Ward/flickr

Why a population of, say, 15 million makes sense for Australia

Australia's GPI, a broad measure of national wellbeing, has stalled since 1974. So what has been the point of huge population and GDP growth since then if we and our environment are no better off?
Ask your child what their toys did while they were out today or invite them to help you read the mail. Evgeny Atamanenko/Shutterstock

How to encourage literacy in young children (and beyond)

Supporting early childhood literacy is not just about reading to your child. Research has found there are many and varied ways to increase literacy in early learning.

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