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University of Toronto

Established in 1827, the University of Toronto has one of the strongest research and teaching faculties in North America, presenting top students at all levels with an intellectual environment unmatched in depth and breadth on any other Canadian campus.

With more than 75,000 students across three campuses (St. George, Mississauga and Scarborough) and over 450,000 alumni active in every region of the world, U of T’s influence is felt in every area of human endeavour.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 748 articles

Canada is preventing provinces and territories from using federal child-care dollars to transform schools into one-stop centres for young children. (Pexels/Yan Krukov)

Why doesn’t Canada let schools provide child care?

Canada has much to learn from other countries about better ways of providing learning and care for children.
Multiple generations living under one roof is becoming increasingly common. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Cole Burston

Multigenerational living: A strategy to cope with unaffordable housing?

Our study reveals that the housing affordability crisis is having a pervasive impact on Canadian society. It is imposing constraints that alter the structure and composition of Canadian families.
Crypto trading platforms Celsius and Voyager filed for bankruptcy in July 2022, suspending all withdrawals, swaps and transfers between accounts and leaving users’ assets trapped inside their platforms. (Shutterstock)

Crypto platforms say they’re exchanges, but they’re more like banks

Because cryptocurrency exchange platforms act more like banks, they should be subject to increased oversight to protect clients’ assets.
Epilepsy is characterized by spontaneous and recurrent seizures, often triggered by stress or visual stimuli. (Shutterstock)

What epilepsy teaches us about diversity and resilience

Our team studied the activity of neurons in people with epilepsy. Neurons in the brain regions responsible for triggering seizures were much less diverse.
Universities need to offer planned socializing for students who entered programs after 2020 and are less likely to know other people in their cohort. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nicole Osborne

Students returning to campus want the ‘university experience’ missed during COVID-19

Students in an international survey said they really missed chances to be together in person for campus-related activities, not only due to academic concerns.
A woman wearing a burka walks through a bird market as she holds her child in downtown Kabul in May after Taliban rulers ordered all Afghan women to wear head-to-toe clothing in public. (AP Photo/Ebrahim Noroozi)

Afghanistan a year after the Taliban occupation: An ongoing war on human rights

In the year since the Taliban’s takeover of Afghanistan, human rights abuses are off the charts, particularly towards women and ethnic minorities.
Global central banks, like the Bank of Canada, are considering their own digital currencies as a backstop to prepare for a future where cryptocurrency dethrones cash as king. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld

Central bank digital currencies could mean the end of democracy

Central banks worldwide are racing to implement national digital currencies, yet democratic considerations are hardly discussed in public. This has to change.
Saralake Estates Mobile Home Park in Sarasota, Florida. Jeffrey Greenberg/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Debunking stereotypes about mobile homes could make them a new face of affordable housing

Manufactured housing – the preferred name for what were once called mobile homes – has changed dramatically in recent decades. Three planning experts call for giving it a new look.
A section of the Amazon rainforest stands next to soy fields in Belterra, Para state, Brazil, in November 2019. Efforts to save the world’s disappearing species have largely failed so far. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

December global biodiversity summit at risk of failure

The so-called post-2020 global biodiversity framework is a nature counterpart to the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change, and will aim to curb the decline of nature by 2050.
A rare find — a fossil of Stanleycaris hirpex with the nervous system preserved. (Jean Bernard Caron/Royal Ontario Museum)

Three-eyed Cambrian fossils shed new light on arthropod head evolution

The discovery of a fossil over 500 million years old reveals new information. Its brain and nervous system are remarkably preserved, filling in some gaps in what we know about arthropod evolution.
Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, left, plays with children in an early learning and child care centre in Brampton, Ont., March 28, 2022. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Canada’s child-care investment needs to advance climate change policy goals

Where new early learning and child-care programs are located, how they are designed, built and resourced, and what they teach can either add to the problem of climate change or help mitigate it.
In hackathons, people come together to build more extensive and cohesive datasets. (Shutterstock)

Hackathons should be renamed to avoid negative connotations

“Hackathons” can imply breaching security and privacy. To more accurately reflect their creative and constructive intent, they can be referred to instead as “datathons” or “code fests.”
Many caregivers were prevented from seeing and taking care of their loved ones in long-terms care homes during the COVID-19 pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Ryan Remiorz

Caregivers were traumatized by COVID-19 public health and long-term care policies

Family caregivers of residents in longterm care homes experienced a collective trauma as they were kept away from their loved ones during the pandemic. This isolation has long-ranging impacts.
Health-care workers in Toronto protest the Canadian truckers convoy last February that was against vaccine mandates. (Shutterstock)

Understanding why people reject science could lead to solutions for rebuilding trust

To communicate scientific findings that are relevant to the public, science communicators need to understand how to overcome attitudes that are anti-science.
OxyContin, an opioid drug heavily marketed by Purdue Pharma, is associated with billions of dollars of health-care costs in Canada related to the opioid crisis. (AP Photo/Toby Talbot)

$150M is not enough: Canada’s proposed Purdue Pharma settlement for opioid damages is paltry and won’t prevent future crises

The Purdue Pharma settlement is paltry compared to costs of the opioid crisis. Without major changes to pharma industry regulation, there is little reason to think a similar crisis won’t occur again.

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