West Virginia University

WVU’s mission is to deliver high-quality education, excel in discovery and innovation, model a culture of diversity and inclusion, promote health and vitality, and build pathways for the exchange of knowledge and opportunity between the state, the nation, and the world.

Their vision is to, by 2020 to attain national research prominence, thereby enhancing educational achievement, global engagement, diversity, and the vitality and well-being of the people of West Virginia.

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Displaying 1 - 20 of 57 articles

Naloxone is often used to revive people overdosing from opioids. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Why genetics makes some people more vulnerable to opioid addiction – and protects others

Scientists are just starting to understand how your parents' genes and experiences might shape your own susceptibility to dangerous drugs. Could that help to stop addictions before they start?
House Speaker Paul Ryan’s attempt to replace the Affordable Care Act in March 2017 was just one of many to undo the health law. AP Photo/Susan Walsh

Why the extreme reaction to Obamacare could be the new normal in American politics

Efforts to undo Obamacare went far beyond grass-roots activities, with new research showing that contributions by businesses were significant. Does this signal a change in the political process?
Oklahoma teachers rally outside the state Capitol in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Lenzy Krehbiel-Burton/Reuters

5 things to know about the teacher strike in Oklahoma

The Oklahoma teachers strike is about more than just pay, but rather a longstanding pattern of decline in funding for the state's public schools.
Coal miner Scott Tiller works next to a drill in an underground coal mine roughly 40 inches high in Welch, West Virginia. AP Photo/David Goldman

Black lung disease on the rise: 5 questions answered

A recent study found the largest cluster of advanced black lung disease ever recorded among coal miners in central Appalachia. Two doctors who treat black lung patients explain how miners contract it.
Funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) has run out. stockcreations/shutterstock.com

Time to stop using 9 million children as a bargaining CHIP

Funding for a children's health insurance program ran out at the end of last September. Despite the program's clear benefits, plans to renew it have been caught in partisan bickering.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in a Nov. 30, 2017 photo as he talked to small business owners about the tax bill. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

How the tax bill opens wide a big back door to overhaul health care

The Senate tax bill cuts taxes for many of the nation's richest and cuts programs for social safety nets. Here's how the Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid are all affected.
Senator Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, considered a powerful dealmaker, failed to get the necessary votes to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

US health care system: A patchwork that no one likes

Many Western, industrialized nations provide health insurance. The US has repeatedly balked at universal coverage. So what kind of system are we left with? A very unpopular one.
Close to 9 million children could be affected if funding for health insurance for them expires. Billion Photos/www.shutterstock.com

Clock running out on health program for 9 million kids

Funding for the children's health insurance program is in jeopardy if Congress does not act by September 30. Here's a look at what's at stake, and how Congress could act to secure funding for CHIP.
From left, Sen. Dean Heller, R-Nev., Sen. Bill Cassidy, R-La., Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., and Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., hold a press conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017. AP Photo/Andrew Harnik

How the latest effort to repeal Obamacare would affect millions

A Senate vote in July seemed to signal the end of efforts to kill the Affordable Care Act. With a Sept. 30 deadline looming, though, a new bill has real possibilities. Here's why that could be bad.
Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell at an Aug. 1 press conference, the first he held after the defeat of his health care bill. AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite

Why state-level single-payer health care efforts are doomed

With Obamacare in peril and no health care plan in sight, it's logical to ask whether states could design their own single-payer health insurance plans. Efforts in California show why it's unlikely.
Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) cast the pivotal vote to nix the Senate version of a bill to repeal Obamacare, only days after returning to Washington after surgery. AP Photo/Cliff Owen

Trump isn’t letting Obamacare die; he’s trying to kill it

After the Senate nixed a repeal of Obamacare, Pres. Trump turned to Twitter, vowing to let the law die. But he's actually doing much more. Here's how he's taking an active part in destroying the law.

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