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Articles on 2020 US elections

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Facial recognition technology raises serious ethical and privacy questions, even as it helps investigators south of the border zero in on the rioters who stormed the U.S. Capitol. (Pixabay)

As U.S. Capitol investigators use facial recognition, it begs the question: Who owns our faces?

We have unwittingly volunteered our faces in social media posts and photos stored in the cloud. But we've yet to determine who owns the data associated with the contours of our faces.
White supremacists clash with police in Charlottesville in 2017. Evan Nesterak/Wikipedia

Debate: A geopolitical reading of fear

Despite moments of hope, worries about the present and fears that the future may be even worse have been rising for decades. What can geopolitics teach us about the global impact of fear?
Elliott Zaagman from Michigan casts his ballot in the Democrats Abroad global presidential primary at Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Thailand, March 3, 2020. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Americans around the world were part of the largest voter turnout in U.S. history

An international volunteer team of marketing, branding, graphic design and media experts collaborated to position Vote From Abroad as a destination for out-of-country American voters.
Children wave American flags before an event with President-elect Joe Biden in November 2020, in Wilmington, Del. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris could transform American childhood

What happens over the next four years in Joe Biden/Kamala Harris administration could have a lasting impact on how childhood is understood and experienced in the United States and beyond.
Far-right and ultra-nationalist groups, including the Northern Guard, Proud Boys and individuals wearing Soldiers of Odin patches, gathered to protest the government’s lawsuit settlement with Canadian torture victim Omar Khadr in Toronto in October 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

The U.S. Capitol violence could happen in Canada — here are 3 ways to prevent it

As the raid on the U.S. Capitol has shown, some kinds of rhetoric can set fire to the world — and it exists in Canada, too. Here's how to tamp it down and focus on positive forms of rhetoric.
Charged with restoring public faith in US justice system: Joe Biden with his nominee for attorney general, Merrick Garland. EPA-EFE/Shawn Thew

Who’s who in Joe Biden’s cabinet

What can Biden's picks for his cabinet tell us about his administration?
Lawmakers hide in the House chamber of the U.S. Capitol as Trump supporters raid the building on Jan. 6, 2020. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

By inciting Capitol mob, Trump pushes U.S. closer to a banana republic

Rather than denigrating other nations as banana republics for their penchant for insurrections and lawless coups, the United States needs to take a long look inward following the raid on the Capitol.
Supporters of President Donald Trump climb the west wall of the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, in Washington, D.C. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Thought the U.S. Capitol attack couldn’t happen? Think again: The insurrection threat isn’t over

U.S. citizens and lawmakers failed to account for the threat to democracy that resulted in the storming of the Capitol. This reflects a denial of the series of events that led to this moment.
After President Trump incited violence on Jan. 6, some high-ranking officials say he is unfit to lead the United States. Probal Rashid/LightRocket via Getty Images)

How does the 25th Amendment work, and can it be used to remove Trump from office after US Capitol attack?

Vice President Pence could invoke the 25th Amendment of the US Constitution, also known as the Disability Clause, if he believes Trump is 'unable to discharge the powers and duties of his office.'
A supporter of President Donald Trump, seen wearing a QAnon shirt, is confronted by Capitol Police officers outside the Senate Chamber during the invasion of the U.S. Capitol. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

QAnon and the storm of the U.S. Capitol: The offline effect of online conspiracy theories

Conspiracy theories spread online are the backbone of Donald Trump's falsehoods about his loss in the U.S. election. The real world consequences of those conspiracies have now exploded.

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