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Articles on Voting

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Mail-in and absentee ballots, like these being processed by election workers in Pennsylvania, are a subject of misinformation spreading across social media. AP Photo/Matt Slocum

5 types of misinformation to watch out for while ballots are being counted – and after

Election misinformation typically involves false narratives of fraud that include out-of-context or otherwise misleading images and faulty statistics as purported evidence.
Will Donald Trump win again? History suggests it’s possible. The president pumps his fist after speaking at a campaign rally at Phoenix Goodyear Airport on Oct. 28, 2020, in Goodyear, Ariz. (AP Photo/Ross D. Franklin)

Why voter loyalty to incumbents could spell victory for Trump

Americans at the ballot box have historically adopted the adage: Better the devil you know than the devil you don't. Does that mean Trump will win a second term?
Ransomware attacks often strike local government computer systems, which poses a challenge for protecting elections. PRImageFactory/iStock via Getty Images

Ransomware can interfere with elections and fuel disinformation – basic cybersecurity precautions are key to minimizing the damage

A ransomware attack on election-related government computers in a Georgia county raises the specter of more disruptions for Election Day voting and vote tabulation.
A sign keeping campaigners at a distance in the New Hampshire presidential primary election at the Town Hall in Chichester, New Hampshire, Feb. 9, 2016. Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

19th-century political parties kidnapped reluctant voters and printed their own ballots – and that’s why we’ve got laws regulating behavior at polling places

Laws that have long kept campaigners away from voters at polling places may not work in a world where a T-shirt symbol can be interpreted as campaigning.
Virtual neighborhood meetings, like this Democratic effort in Reedsburg, Wis., are among the latest efforts to get people to vote. AP Photo/Tom Beaumont

What’s the best way to get out the vote in a pandemic?

Strangers used to call and stop by; now the most effective way to get people to vote involves getting groups of friends and neighbors to pressure each other to participate in democracy.
Something about our current moment seems to have put a particular strain on our personal relationships. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Why friendships are falling apart over politics

A recent Pew survey showed just how deep the divide has become, with about 40% of registered voters saying that they didn't have a single close friend supporting a different presidential candidate.
With its largely white and older workers, this poll site in Maine is typical of poll sites across the U.S. Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Poll workers on Election Day will be younger – and probably more diverse – due to COVID-19

An army of mostly older, white volunteers run America's voting sites. They're reluctant to work during a pandemic. So new recruits are signing up to run the polls, for better and for worse.

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