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Articles on Artificial intelligence

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Crowds gather at dusk in Austin, Texas, to watch some 1.5 million Mexican free-tailed bats emerge to feed from their roost under the Congress Avenue Bridge. Jeff Haynes/AFP via Getty Images

Artificial intelligence can help highway departments find bats roosting under bridges

Bats roost under bridges and culverts across North America, so highway departments have to check for them before repairing bridges. A new AI tool makes those inspections faster and more accurate.
Undergraduate students need to learn the responsible use of data science as well as the nuts and bolts. Hill Street Studios/Stone via Getty Images

Data science education lacks a much-needed focus on ethics

Undergraduate programs are springing up across the US to meet the burgeoning demand for workers trained in big data. Yet many of the programs lack training in the ethical use of data science.
Government agencies are increasingly using facial recognition technology, including through security cameras like this one being installed on the Lincoln Memorial in 2019. Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Feds are increasing use of facial recognition systems – despite calls for a moratorium

Politicians of all stripes, computer professionals and even big-tech executives are calling on government to hit the brakes on using these algorithms. The feds are hitting the gas.
The subtleties of how genes are transcribed into RNA molecules like the one depicted here are key to understanding the inner workings of cells. Christoph Burgstedt/Science Photo Library via Getty Images

Machine learning plus insights from genetic research shows the workings of cells – and may help develop new drugs for COVID-19 and other diseases

Machine learning is great at finding patterns but doesn’t know what those patterns mean. Combine it with knowledge gained from genetic research and you have a powerful view into the workings of cells.
Shutterstock/Sergey Tinyakov

When faces are partially covered, neither people nor algorithms are good at reading emotions

Robots are more likely than people to misclassify emotions when reading faces that are partially covered. This could lead to unexpected behaviours when they interact with people wearing masks.
It should be obvious to this diver that this is a shipwreck and not a reef, but what about to someone looking at a image of this spot taken from an aircraft? LookBermuda/Flickr

AI spots shipwrecks from the ocean surface – and even from the air

It’s difficult to tell a shipwreck from a natural feature on the ocean floor in a scan taken from a plane or ship. This project used deep learning to get it right 92% of the time.

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