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Articles on Bashar al-Assad

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President Donald Trump has rapidly, and without warning to allies or even his own officials, shifted U.S. foreign policy in Syria. AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta

Syria military presence risks US credibility with world community

In northern Syria, Trump has caused U.S. allies and rivals to view American commitments in a new, uncertain light. Other countries may now shift to depend less on the U.S., weakening national power.
A Syrian refugee child sits on the window of his family’s trailer home painted by refugee artists in a camp near Mafraq, Jordan. AP/Raad Adayleh

5 ways the Syrian revolution continues

The revolution begun by Syrians exactly eight years ago has been won – by the murderous leader they rebelled against. But the struggle for freedom, dignity and justice Syrians launched is not over.
Syrian anti-government protesters march as part of an uprising against the country’s authoritarian regime, in Banias, Syria, April 17, 2011. The Arabic banner at center reads: ‘All of us would die for our country.’ AP/Anonymous

How the Syrian uprising began and why it matters

On the eighth anniversary of the Syrian uprising, scholar Wendy Pearlman writes about the people who risked their lives and raised their voices to fight the oppressive rule of Bashar al-Assad.
Garbage piled up in the opposition-held city of Afrin, Syria, in March 2018. AP/Lefteris Pitarakis

Garbage collection in Syria is crucial to fighting the Islamic State

Keeping the water and power on, managing sewers and collecting garbage will help communities shattered by the Syrian civil war rebuild – and keep out the Islamic State, says a former aid official.
In 2014, this boy was affected by what activists say was a gas attack on the Syrian town of Telminnes; the most recent chemical attack was reported in late November, 2018 REUTERS/Amer Alfaj

Syria may be using chemical weapons against its citizens again – here’s how international law has changed to help countries intervene

For decades, international law did not allow one country to attack another that was using chemical weapons on its own people without UN approval. That’s changed, which means trouble for Syria.

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