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Articles on Body clock

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It’s harder for kids to get to sleep when it’s light outside and they’re not as tired. Alena Ozerova/Shutterstock

6 ways to stop daylight saving derailing your child’s sleep

Daylight saving time starts this weekend, and it can often be the beginning of new dramas getting kids to bed. Here’s how to make the transition a little smoother.
Is a bottle of morning milk at night the equivalent of turning on all the lights at bedtime? comzeal images/Shutterstock.com

Human breast milk may help babies tell time via circadian signals from mom

Breast milk contains ingredients in concentrations that change over the course of the day. Researchers think milk is chrononutrition, carrying molecular messages to help set a baby’s internal clock.
Changing to daylight saving time can impact our mood, our risk of heart attack and how much exercise we get. Gregory Pappas

How the switchover to daylight saving time affects our health

Daylight saving time begins this weekend, which means many of us will get an hour less sleep. But the health effects go beyond sleep – and can last two weeks or more. Here’s what the research says.
The circadian rhythm is present in every single cell of your body, guided by the central clock that resides in the brain. Creations/Shutterstock.com

Simple blood test could read people’s internal clock

Everybody has a personal internal clock in their brain that dictates when we feel like eating, waking and sleeping. But what happens when our life doesn’t match our body clock? And how do we read it?

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