Menu

Articles on Opioid epidemic

Displaying 21 - 40 of 53 articles

Naloxone is often used to revive people overdosing from opioids. REUTERS/Brian Snyder

Why genetics makes some people more vulnerable to opioid addiction – and protects others

Scientists are just starting to understand how your parents' genes and experiences might shape your own susceptibility to dangerous drugs. Could that help to stop addictions before they start?
Pain lets us know when there is something wrong, but sometimes our brains can trick us. Mai Lam/The Conversation NY-BD-CC

Trust Me I’m An Expert: The science of pain

Trust Me I’m An Expert: The science of pain. The Conversation58.7 MB (download)
Our podcast Trust Me, I'm An Expert, goes beyond the headlines and asks researchers to explain the evidence on issues making news. Today, we're talking pain and what science says about managing it.
Vivitrol, a non-opioid medication, is used to treat some cases of opioid dependence. Addiction specialists stress that not all patients need medication, but that many do. AP Photo/Carla K. Carlson

Why treating addiction with medication should be carefully considered

The U.S. has had multiple drug epidemics, and, until recently, has not had evidence-tested ways to help people. That has changed. New medicines can help. But other medical issues should also be addressed.
The leaves of the plant kratom. MIA Studios/Shutterstock.com

The dangers and potential of ‘natural’ opioid kratom

The herb kratom has a large following and is so popular that it is sold in vending machines. The FDA recently issued a public warning about the herb, which contains low levels of opioids.
President Donald Trump displays a presidential memorandum he signed, declaring the opioid crisis a public health emergency in the East Room of the White House, Oct. 26, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Why Canada should declare a national opioid emergency too

Opioids kill an average of eight people every day in Canada. The federal government must officially declare this a 'public welfare emergency' and invest the funds critical to a humane response.
Michelle Holley holds a photograph of her daughter Jaime Holley, 19, who died of a heroin overdose in November 2016. Lynne Sladky/AP Photo

The opioid epidemic in 6 charts

Your guide to a public health crisis that's likely to get worse.
Paul Wright, in treatment for opioid addiction in June 2017 at the Neil Kennedy Recovery Clinic in Youngstown Ohio, shows a photo of himself from 2015, when he almost died from an overdose. AP Photo/David Dermer

How Big Pharma is hindering treatment of the opioid addiction epidemic

The number of people dying from opioid overdose continues to rise, in part because of cheap street drugs. Yet the price of a drug used to treat addiction is out of reach for many.
Ohio is fighting to hold drug companies accountable for their role in the opioid epidemic. Bryan Woolston/Reuters

A look inside Ohio’s lawsuit against opioid manufacturers

The state of Ohio filed a lawsuit against opioid manufacturers. Will their legal arguments hold up in court – and what will it mean for other cities and states going after big pharma?
Governor Charlie Baker of Massachusetts and unidentified woman at a rally in November aiming to destigmatize addiction. Joanne DeCaro/flickr

Some good news on opioid epidemic: Treatment options are expanding

The nation is still in the grip of an opioid addiction epidemic, but there is some good news. Treatment options are expanding, as professionals learn more about the illness.

Top contributors

More