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Articles on Women in science

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Ada King, Countess of Lovelace, was more than just another mathematician. Watercolor portrait of Ada King, Countess of Lovelace by Alfred Edward Chalon via Wikimedia

Ada Lovelace’s skills with language, music and needlepoint contributed to her pioneering work in computing

Lovelace was a prodigious math talent who learned from the giants of her time, but her linguistic and creative abilities were also important in her invention of computer programming.
Building relationships with colleagues outside of work is important for career development. 10'000 Hours/Digital Vision via Getty Images

Fishing, strip clubs and golf: How male-focused networking in medicine blocks female colleagues from top jobs

By surveying over 100 people in academic medicine, a researcher found that women are consistently excluded from important networking activities like watching sports, drinking at bars and playing golf.
Working from home comes with many distractions. MoMoProductions/Digital Vision via Getty Images

Surveys of scientists show women and young academics suffered most during pandemic and may face long-term career consequences

Many scientists stuck at home during university closures dealt with increased domestic responsibilities. But some groups had it worse than others.
Mary Elizabeth Shutler in Vanuatu, in the1960s. Permitted to join the first archaeological expedition to New Caledonia in 1952 as a ‘voluntary assistant’, she was the only French speaker and chief interlocuter with the Kanak people. Family archives, reproduced with the kind authorisation of John Shutler & Susan Arter.

Friday essay: invisible no more – putting the first women archaeologists of the Pacific back on the map

‘Wives’, volunteers, assistants: the vital contribution of women archaeologists has long been underplayed, if not erased. A new project uncovers trailblazers in the Pacific.
Women have a huge amount to contribute to science and research, if the right support systems are in place. Per-Anders Pettersson/Getty Images

Study sheds light on what it takes for women to succeed – or not – in science in Africa

Reasons why women’s voices are ignored in science reporting range from socio-cultural influences that inform gender norms, to perceptions of leadership and political power structures.

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