Science + Technology – Articles, Analysis, Opinion

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A waxwork of Captain America on display at Madame Tussauds in Bangkok, Thailand. Nuamfolio/Shutterstock.com

Doping soldiers so they fight better – is it ethical?

Doping is condemned in sports. But what about in the military? Should soldiers be allowed or even encouraged to take drugs that make them superior fighters and more likely to complete a mission?
How many lakes are in Alaska? Thermokarst lakes on Alaska’s North Slope are self-similar and fractal. Painting by Cherissa Dukelow

Mathematics of scale: Big, small and everything in between

What do earthquakes, wealthy Italian families and your circulatory system have in common? Scientists use fractals, self-similarity and power laws to translate from local to global scales.
How long has that water already been in the system? mike.irwin/Shutterstock.com

Water stays in the pipes longer in shrinking cities – a challenge for public health

In many municipalities, aging water infrastructure is serving fewer people than it was built to accommodate. Out of sight has meant out of mind – but resulting changes in water quality may affect safety.
Researchers have discovered a lineage of yeast species that ignores the laws of cell growth. Alexander Kirch/Shutterstock.com

An outlaw yeast thrives with genetic chaos – and could provide clues for understanding cancer growth

Yeast isn't just important for the foods we consume. A rogue lineage of yeast species that evolves faster than any other is revealing secrets that may help illuminate the molecular causes of cancer.
An apparently unidentified object detected on a Navy plane’s infrared camera. U.S. Department of Defense/Navy Times

Why is the Pentagon interested in UFOs?

During a military mission, whether in peace or in war, the inability to identify an object within an area of operation represents a significant problem.
The crests (bright) and troughs (dark) of waves spread out after they were produced. The picture applies to both light and sound waves. Titima Ongkantong

A new type of laser uses sound waves to help to detect weak forces

Most people are familiar with lasers. But what about a laser made with sound rather than light? A couple of physicists have now created one that they plan to use for measuring imperceivable forces.
The internet is growing, but old information continues to disappear daily. wk1003mike/shutterstock.com

Your internet data is rotting

MySpace users were recently shocked to learn that the company lost 50 million user files. It's a harsh lesson in not leaving your intellectual property unprotected on the information superhighway.
Don’t end up like this person. fizkes/Shutterstock.com

How cryptocurrency scams work

Cryptocurrency fraudsters have swindled their victims out of hundreds of millions – even billions – of dollars. What do they do to earn people's trust and then take their money?
The math of raindrops. Stefan Holm/shutterstock.com

What happens when a raindrop hits a puddle?

Why does the impact of rain in a puddle look different from when it falls elsewhere, like in a lake or the ocean? A 'puddle equation' dives deep into the secret math of ripples.
A 6-month-old who is infected with measles in Madagascar, March 2019. AP Photo/Laetitia Bezain

Road to measles elimination is predictable, but can be rocky

Scientists identified the general pattern of measles infections as a country moves toward eliminating the disease. This roadmap can help public health workers most efficiently fight and end measles.