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Articles on Africa's economy

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Flags of India and African countries at the 2015 India Africa Friendship Summit in New Delhi. Photo by Priyanka Parashar/Mint via Getty Images

Africa’s relationship with India: a diplomat’s view

A new book places the responsibility of African growth on its leaders, people, and civil society, while also recognising the role partners like India can play in achieving its goals.
US Secretary of State Antony Blinken and Senegalese Foreign Minister Aissata Tall Sall in Dakar, Senegal. Photo by Andrew Harnik /pool/AFP/via Getty Images

Africa can use great power rivalry to its benefit: Here is how

African countries should adopt measures that strategically play rivals against each other. They should implement long-term strategies and domestic policies for dealing with strategic partners.
Elizabeth Dlamini at her curio stall in the Ezulwini Valley near Mbabane, eSwatini. The kingdom’s economy is dependent on its larger neightbour, South Africa. EFE-EPA/John Hrusha

South Africa’s apartheid regime manipulated borders. Today, the effects linger

International borders were negotiable for the right price. What residents of former ‘homelands’ and of Lesotho and eSwatini have in common now are limited government services and few job prospects.
Unemployed Liberian young men seeking daily jobs at the industrial district of Bushrod Island, Monrovia, Liberia. EFE-EPA/Ahmed Jallanzo

How COVID-19 is likely to slow down a decade of youth development in Africa

Since 1999, extreme poverty has declined while rates of young people in education and employment have risen. Without investment though, the impact of the pandemic could see this progress imperilled,
Kwame Akoto-Bamfo’s sculpture dedicated to the memory of the victims of the Transatlantic slave trade on display in Montgomery, Alabama. Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

Why the West is morally bound to offer reparations for slavery

The turn towards authoritarianism, xenophobia and racism in Western democracies makes it unlikely that former Western slave-trading nations will agree to reparations in the near future.

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