Articles on Agent Orange

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Cleaners enter the Holyoke Soldiers’ Home in Holyoke, Massachusetts, where a coronavirus outbreak has killed more than 40 veterans. Getty/Jessica Rinaldi/The Boston Globe

8 ways veterans are particularly at risk from the coronavirus pandemic

With the challenges posed by the coronavirus pandemic, veterans who were already lacking adequate benefits and resources are now in deeper trouble.
Some U.S. service members may now collect damages for medical malpractice. Shutterstock/Christopher Lyzcen

Congress fixes – just a bit – the unpopular, ‘unfair’ rule that stopped injured service members from suing for damages

For more than half a century, service members who got hurt while on active duty but not in combat – like being hit by a jeep while on base – could never sue for damages. That's now changed – a bit.
Fischer believed his immunity broke down a lot more quickly as a direct consequence of his exposure to Agent Orange in the Vietnam war. AAP/Alex Murray

What Tim Fischer’s cancer tells us about the impact of Agent Orange on other Vietnam veterans

More than 500 Australians died in the Vietnam war and 3,000 were wounded, but the damage from Agent Orange was much more far-reaching, as Tim Fischer's death last week reminded us.
Unlike napalm, which immediately scalded its victims, Agent Orange kills and maims slowly over time, its effects passed down through generations. U.S. Army Operations in Vietnam R.W. Trewyn, Ph.D/Wikimedia

Agent Orange, exposed: How U.S. chemical warfare in Vietnam unleashed a slow-moving disaster

The use of Agent Orange in Vietnam had deep impacts, including a poisoned water supply, birth defects and cancer. Despite decades of attempted litigation, justice for spraying victims seems unlikely.

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