Articles on American South

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A damaged Confederate statue lies on a pallet in a warehouse in Durham, N.C. on Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, after protesters yanked it off its pedestal in front of a government building. AP Photo/Allen Breed

A Confederate statue graveyard could help bury the Old South

Where do old Confederate statues go when they die? The former Soviet bloc countries could teach the US something about dealing with monuments from a painful past.
Civil rights organizations have sued Georgia’s Republican secretary of state for failing to register 53,000 new voters, most of them black. Reuters/Christopher Aluka Berry

Georgia election fight shows that black voter suppression, a southern tradition, still flourishes

Georgia's secretary of state has stalled voter registrations and accused Democrats of hacking. His tactics recall past efforts in the South to suppress black votes, from poll taxes to literacy tests
Prison jobs are always low paid, often difficult, and produce many of the foodstuffs and services many Americans use every day. Reuters/Lucy Nicholson

Prisoner strike exposes an age old American reliance on forced labor

Enslaved workers used to grow cotton and mill flour. Now prisoners grind beef and crate eggs. Here, a historian explores Americans' troubling habit of consuming the products of slave labor.
Nearly 100 percent of all black voters in Alabama supported Doug Jones for Senate. What can he offer this base in return? AP Photo/John Bazemore

Black voters won Alabama for the Dems. Here’s what they need in return

Almost 100 percent of black Alabamians voted for Doug Jones. The Democratic senator-elect can thank this key base by addressing his home state's problems with rural poverty, education and health care.
Confederate General P.G.T. Beauregard is removed from the entrance to City Park in New Orleans. REUTERS/Cheryl Gerber

What to do with Confederate statues?

A scholar of southern politics finds inspiration in an unexpected place.

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