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In this episode, Roberta Timothy explains why racial justice is a public health issue and talks about why she believes historical scientific racism needs to be addressed. Dr. David Tom Cooke, of UC Davis Health, participated in Pfizer’s clinical trial as part of an effort to reduce skepticism about the COVID-19 vaccine. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)

Black health matters: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 5 transcript

Transcript of Don't Call Me Resilient, Episode 5: Black health matters
In this episode, Roberta Timothy talks about her new international health project, Black Health Matters, and explains why racial justice is a public health issue. In this photo, Dr. Janice Bacon, a primary care physician with Central Mississippi Health Services, gives Jeremiah Young, 11, a physical exam. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

Black health matters: Don’t Call Me Resilient EP 5

When COVID-19 first appeared, some called it the great equalizer. But the facts quickly revealed a grim reality: COVID-19 disproportionately impacts racialized communities.
This mural in-progress outside the Apple store in Montréal is a sign of antiracist allyship: will this work help society start to address the long-term health impacts of racism? THE CANADIAN PRESS/Paul Chiasson

5 ways to address internalized white supremacy and its impact on health

While many institutions pledged their support for anti-racism work this summer, a health researcher says these ideas need to go further to address the long-term health impacts of internalized racism.
Ending racism in schools requires a deep understanding of anti-Black racism. (Wayne Lee Sing/Unsplash)

How to curb anti-Black racism in Canadian schools

Although school boards have yet to find a systemic way to combat anti-Black racism, educators are in a unique position to correct these injustices.
Students of School Section #13 with teacher, Verlyn Ladd, who taught at the school from 1939 to 1958. Class of 1951, Buxton, Raleigh Township, Ontario. (Buxton National Historic Site & Museum)

Black History: How racism in Ontario schools today is connected to a history of segregation

An 1850 act permitted the creation of separate schools for Protestants, Catholics and for any five Black families. Some white people used the act to force Black students into separate institutions.
A woman waits for a streetcar in Toronto on April 16, 2020. The many Black people working in essential jobs do not have the luxury of staying home during the pandemic. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette

Coronavirus discriminates against Black lives through surveillance, policing and the absence of health data

Black lives are further in peril in a time of COVID-19. Subject to death on both the public health and policing fronts, we will not be silent.
John Marrion depicted here was part of the 104th (New Brunswick) Regiment of Foot. The 104th soldiers once snowshoed over a thousand kilometres in about fifty days during the War of 1812. Beaverbrook Collection of War Art/Canadian War Museum/CWM 19810948-008 (NO REUSE)

Meet the Black snowshoers who walked 1,000 kilometres across Canada in 1813

The Canadian soldiers who took part in one of the biggest feats of the War of 1812 included Black soldiers of the 104th New Brunswick Regiment of Foot.
The recent maternal health crisis of tennis player Serena Williams was a flash point for many health professionals. A photo of Williams with her daughter from her Instagram account. Instagram/SerenaWilliams

9 ways racism impacts maternal health

As we celebrate moms this Mother’s Day, let's remember that maternal health is a right that many do not enjoy.
Ancestry ad depicts a white man in 19th-century clothing standing in front of a Black woman holding a ring telling her they can leave and be together in Canada. Ancestry

Ancestry ad gets it wrong: Canada was never slave-free

Canadian audiences did not object to Ancestry's ad which romanticized Canada as “Promised land,” but they should have.
Detail from Mickalene Thomas’s ‘Le Dejeuner sur l’herbe: Les trois femmes noires’ which is part of a show called ‘Femmes Noires’ currently at the Art Gallery of Ontario. The Rachel and Jean-Pierre Lehmann Collection © Mickalene Thomas

Black Canadian women artists detangle the roots of Black beauty

A recent and powerful exhibit by New York artist Mickalene Thomas at the Art Gallery of Ontario has opened the door for some deep discussions about Black Canadian women and visual representation.

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