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The world’s leaders have tried to stop deforestation before, but have had little success. (AP Photo/Michael Probst)

COP26 deforestation deal key to slowing climate change, but Canada must tackle issues of carbon accounting and industry

The pledge to end deforestation holds great potential, but Canada has some work ahead if it is to make meaningful progress on the new goal and stop ongoing forest and carbon loss.
Wildfire smoke rises near Prince Albert, Sask., in May 2021, where a fast-moving wildfire led local officials to declare a state of emergency. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Kayle Neis

How wildfires affect climate change — and vice versa

Recent wildfire seasons have been worsened by climate change. But wildfires also lead to additional climate warming when they release carbon dioxide to the atmosphere.
A helicopter drops water on a forest fire in Alaska. Michael Risinger/U.S. Army National Guard

As extreme fires transform Alaska’s boreal forest, deciduous trees put a brake on carbon loss and how fast the forest burns

A new study finds more deciduous trees like aspen are growing in after severe fires in the region, and that has some unexpected impacts.
The United Nation Environment Program is leading the Global Peatlands Initiative to save peatlands and help keep climate change in check. (Bin Xu)

How scientists are restoring boreal peatlands to help keep carbon in the ground

Peatlands store more soil carbon than any other terrestrial ecosystem, including tropical forests. But they have been heavily exploited and damaged. Now, scientists are working to restore them.
Oilsands tailings are a mixture of water, suspended sand, clay and residual bitumen. (Dan Prat/Canva)

How plants can help clean up oilsands tailing ponds

A new nature-based approach to managing oilsands tailings shows promise in the lab and may soon be tested in the field.
A wildfire moves towards the town of Anzac from Fort McMurray, Alta. in May 2016. Jason Franson/The Canadian Press via AP

More frequent fires could dramatically alter boreal forests and emit more carbon

The boreal forest is being reshaped by wildfire. As climate change intensifies wildfire activity, the boreal forest will likely become a carbon source.
A wildfire rips through the forest near Fort McMurray on Highway 63 in May 2016. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)

How to fight wildfires and climate change with wetlands

As unlikely as it may sound, a new approach for fighting the destruction of wildfires in Canada’s boreal region may lie in wetlands packed with soaking layers of peat and topped with living moss.
2016’s warm winter meant not enough snow for the start of the Iditarod sled dog race in Anchorage, so it was brought by train from 360 miles north. AP/Rachel D'Oro

In Alaska, everyone’s grappling with climate change

For everyone from traditional hunters to the military, the National Park Service to the oil industry, climate change is the new reality in Alaska. Government, residents and businesses are all trying to adapt.
A firefighter runs while trying to save a home near Lakeport, Calif. on July 31, 2018. AP Photo/Noah Berger, File

Fighting historic wildfires amid bad ideas and no funding

Canada’s boreal region faces bigger, hotter and more frequent wildfires that are increasingly unpredictable, but it lacks an investment in fire science that could help keep communities safe.
Wildfires may grow more frequent and intense in North America amid climate change, like the Fort McMurray blazes in 2016, which were among the worst in Canadian history. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)

How wildfires could radically change forests — and your life

Wildfires amid climate change may spark a radical shift in forest habitats and wildlife. They aren’t just a destructive force of man and nature. They’re a key factor in forest ecosystem renewal.
Higher carbon dioxide levels will not result in faster-growing forests – just the opposite in many places, study finds. rosskevin756/flickr

More CO2 won’t help northern forests or stave off climate change

Study using tree ring data and climate projections shows that buildup of CO2 will not benefit most northern forests and that growth rates will actually fall.

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