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Articles on Biodiversity

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Decomposers at work: Shelf fungi feeding on a rotting log. Craig Joiner/Loop Images/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Beyond flora and fauna: Why it’s time to include fungi in global conservation goals

Fungi underpin life on Earth, but are far less well catalogued and understood than animals and plants. Three scientists call for including fungi in conservation strategies and environmental laws.
Paludiculture in action. Chain-drive equipped tractors are a prerequisite for agricultural activities on rewetted peat soils. (Tobias Dahms)

Wet agriculture could protect peatlands and climate, but remains largely unexplored

Drained peatlands contribute five per cent of global carbon emissions. Paludiculture, or agriculture on wet peatlands, protects peatlands and allows farmers to maintain their livelihoods.
Fresh grizzly bear tracks in Yellowstone National Park. Jacob W. Frank, NPS/Flickr

Linking protected areas from Yellowstone to the Yukon shows the value of conserving large landscapes, not just isolated parks and preserves

Parks and refuges are important for conservation, but without connections, they’re like islands. Linking them by protecting land in between makes it possible for wildlife to move over bigger areas.
Tourists cross a hanging bridge in the treetops of Costa Rica’s Monteverde cloud forest. Matthew Williams-Ellis/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Protecting biodiversity – and making it accessible – has paid off for Costa Rica

Tourism revenues account for almost 10% of Costa Rica’s gross domestic product. New research shows that charismatic wildlife is necessary but not sufficient to attract ecotourists.
Bees feeding in monoculture fields of single crops such as sunflowers crowd together and pass parasites to one another at high rates. Lauren Ponisio/University of Oregon

Planting mixes of flowers around farm fields helps keep bees healthy

Huge single-crop fields attract bees in such numbers that they spread parasites to one another. Planting diverse mixes of flowers around fields helps spread out pollinators and keep them healthy.

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