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Articles on Bystander effect

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An image from a police body camera shows bystanders including Darnella Frazier, third from right, filming a Minneapolis police officer pressing his knee on George Floyd’s neck. Minneapolis Police Department via AP, File

The ‘bystander effect’ is real – but research shows that when more people witness violence, it’s more likely someone will step up and intervene

A game theory expert explains why a witness to a troubling situation who is in a group may feel a lesser sense of personal responsibility than a single individual.
The Enhanced Assess, Acknowledge, Act (EAAA) Sexual Assault Resistance program is the only campus education program proven to decrease sexual assault. (Shutterstock)

Rape at universities: One program is proven to reduce it

A program developed by a University of Windsor professor significantly reduces a woman's risk of rape on campus. It also focuses on communicating sexual desires.
Watch your step in Copenhagen – no one else will. jacobchristensen

The 21st century bystander effect happens every day online

If you’re going to fall, injure yourself and need help, where is a good place to do it? Should you choose a busy thoroughfare or a deserted backstreet? Statistics and experiments in social psychology will…
In the face of pressures that turn us against each other, it pays to be aware of the potential costs of reducing sympathy. mrhayata/Flickr

Bad Samaritans: why people don’t step in to stop violence

Every now and then, and rarely far apart in time, the media features a story about an assault in public where bystanders failed to come to the victim’s aid. Of course, there are many possible reasons why…

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