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Articles on Cambodia

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At a dance class supported by Cambodian Living Arts, students from the Bassac community. learn classical Khmer dance at Sothearos School in Phnom Penh in 2012. (Daniel Rothenberg)

Cambodia is an inspiration for the healing power of art after a crisis

Cambodia found the strength to rebuild itself through art after the 1979 genocide. While the context is different, this example suggests the importance of art in navigating COVID-19.
Bangladeshi garment workers protest to demand payment of wages, April 2020. Monirul Alam/EPA-EFE

Microfinance loans could spell disaster in the time of coronavirus

When the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to Bangladeshi economist Muhammad Yunus in 2006 for his concept of microfinance, it brought what began as a local policy experiment in the 1970s to global attention…
Reports suggest there are more than 100 tobacco-sponsored schools in China, a country with more than 300 million smokers. (Shutterstock)

China’s tobacco industry is building schools and no one is watching

The Chinese National Tobacco Corporation is expanding its international markets through subsidiaries. Is the world ready for tobacco companies sponsoring or supporting schools?
Archaeological visualization of Angkor Wat at sunset, with site map at upper right. Tom Chandler, Mike Yeates, Chandara Ung and Brent McKee, Monash University, SensiLab, 2019

Angkor Wat archaeological digs yield new clues to its civilization’s decline

Many tourists hold an outdated romanticized image of an abandoned temple emerging from the jungle. But research around Angkor Wat suggests its collapse might be better described as a transformation.
The tribunal in Cambodia’s capital Phnom Penh is looking at whether some actions of the brutal Khmer Rouge regime meet the United Nations definition of genocide. Wikimedia Commons

Cambodians await crucial tribunal finding into 1970s brutal Khmer Rouge regime

A potentially historic ruling on genocide by a tribunal in Cambodia on Friday could unsettle understandings of the past among Cambodians - and create a precedent in international law.
Cambodia’s Prime Minister Hun Sen weaves a traditional cotton scarf In Phnom Penh in June. He won the recent Cambodia election in a landslide after literally rigging the vote by banning the main opposition party, among other tricks. (AP Photo/Heng Sinith)

How Cambodia’s prime minister rigged an election

The re-election of Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen contributes to the growing global democratic crisis. Here's why.

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