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Articles on Cancel culture

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Calling people out for problematic acts — like sexual harassment or racist comments — can lead to them being cancelled. (Shutterstock)

Can we cancel ‘cancel culture?’

Cancel culture has exploded due to social media’s amplifying powers, society’s deep divisions and difficulties redressing longstanding inequities.
A form of ‘canceling’ was common among Baptists in America. Heritage Art/Heritage Images via Getty Images

Cancel culture looks a lot like old-fashioned church discipline

Excommunicating a church member, like ‘canceling’ someone on social media, serves to cleanse the body politic of behavior deemed damaging, suggests a scholar of political theology.
In our current context of rapidly improving technology, archives and museums must constantly make tough decisions about what to keep, what to refuse or even remove. (Shutterstock)

From erasure to recategorizing: What we should do with Dr. Seuss books

Media coverage of the recent Dr. Seuss controversy are rooted in both a lack of awareness of the challenges and realities of maintaining collections and a false understanding of history.
Online shaming leads to personal attacks and resignations, not structural change. (Miguel Bruna/Unsplash)

Twitter shaming won’t change university power structures

Bringing change to universities needs to focus on systems, not people. Although online shaming is effective at removing people from their positions, it doesn’t change systems.
Thanks to algorithms, outrage often snowballs. Andrii Yalanskyi/Shutterstock.com

Hate cancel culture? Blame algorithms

Algorithmic forces fuel cancel culture. Paradoxically, they’re also used to rehabilitate those who have been canceled.

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