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Articles on Chemotherapy

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Some cancer patients receive additional treatment after surgery with the goal of eliminating any remaining tumor cells. BSIP/Collection Mix: Subjects via Getty Images

Cancer often requires more than one treatment − an oncologist explains why some patients like Kate Middleton receive both chemotherapy and surgery

There are many approaches to treating cancer. Which ones work best is determined on an individual basis and informed by each tumor.
Chemotherapy is used to treat all lung cancer patients. Yet many would not need such invasive treatment if diagnosis of the risk of recurrence were more refined. A new technology could change all that. (Shutterstock)

Lung cancer: Predicting which patients are at high risk of recurrence to improve outcomes

Treatment for lung cancer patients is the same for everyone, regardless of the risk of recurrence. The use of a new technology could refine diagnosis.
Hypoxia, or a state of low oxygen, can encourage tumors to spread. This microscopy image visualizes the microenvironment of a breast tumor. Steve Seung-Young Lee, Univ. of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health via Flickr

Stopping the cancer cells that thrive on chemotherapy – research into how pancreatic tumors adapt to stress could lead to a new treatment approach

Some cancers are notoriously resistant to chemotherapy and not curable with surgery. Stopping tumors from adapting to the harsh microenvironments of the body could be a potential treatment avenue.
Many women with metastatic breast cancer feel left out of annual ‘Pinktober’ awareness drives because these campaigns tend to focus on earlier, more curable stages of the disease. kali9/E+ via Getty Images

Breast cancer awareness campaigns can do a better job supporting women who’ve received a stage 4 diagnosis, instead of focusing only on early detection and ‘beating cancer’

A diagnosis of metastatic breast cancer means having cancer for the rest of one’s life – a situation with very different needs and concerns compared to earlier stages of the disease.

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