Articles on Chinese influence

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There are legitimate questions about Liu’s past connections to associations with direct or indirect links with the Chinese Communist Party. Lukas Coch/AAP

Grattan on Friday: Asking questions about Gladys Liu is not racist

Liu's disastrous interview on Sky News forced the government into a full scale defence of her, saying that Labor, in pursuing her, was being “xenophobic” and “grubby”.
As crucial as the Australia-China relationship might be for Australia’s economic well being, the indications suggest the ups and downs may get rougher. Sam Mooy/AAP

Grattan on Friday: Australia isn’t avoiding prodding the Chinese bear

Australia is being very explicit in response to concerns about China at the moment, increasingly prepared to put aside the imperatives of diplomacy when necessary.
Professor of Public Ethics, Clive Hamilton, has warned that unless Australian universities act decisively, they will live “under the ever-darkening shadow of Beijing”. Mick Tsikas/AAP

Academic urges universities to get out from under the ‘shadow of Beijing’.

Professor of Public Ethics, Clive Hamilton, has accused "many" vice-chancellors of of losing sight of academic freedom, under the pressure of revenue and influence from China.
“He was much loved by the Australian community. He was a character - a political character - in an era when you tend to get white bread politicians,” says Michelle Grattan on Tim Fischer. Alan Porritt/AAP

VIDEO: Michelle Grattan on Tim Fischer’s legacy - and Scott Morrison’s first year

Michelle Grattan reflects on Tim Fischer's personal and political legacy, and discusses the kind of leader Scott Morrison is with the anniversary of his prime ministership approaching on Saturday.
WeChat is a Chinese social media platform, similar to Facebook. Shutterstock

How Australia’s Mandarin speakers get their news

Findings from a new study suggest that the main source of news for Mandarin-speakers living in Australia is local, Chinese-language outlets accessed via WeChat.
China’s rising influence in the region has alarmed many defence experts. But the question remains: would Australia ever need to fight China on its own? Joel Carrett/AAP

With China-US tensions on the rise, does Australia need a new defence strategy?

Australia committed A$195 billion to defence spending in 2016, but many now believe this is insufficient with China's rising influence in the region.
Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull, pictured at an Australia China Business Council event at Parliament House last week, knows the country can’t afford to shut the door on Chinese investment. Mick Tsikas/AAP

What’s driving Chinese infrastructure investment overseas and how can we make the most of it?

Chinese financing and know-how present both a threat and an opportunity for infrastructure development. Australia can benefit from proactively identifying needs that Chinese investment can help meet.
Australia’s approach to the debate over Chinese influence should be to carefully disaggregate the various problems under discussion in this debate and risk-manage them individually. Shutterstock

When it comes to China’s influence on Australia, beware of sweeping statements and conflated ideas

China scholars disagree on the extent of Chinese influence on Australian politics – but it may be there are more points of agreement than most scholars realise.
Chinese President Xi Jinping is sworn in for a second term at the National People’s Congress at the Great Hall. AAP/Wu Hong

Why do we keep turning a blind eye to Chinese political interference?

The author of the controversial Silent Invasion argues it's not the book, but the reaction to it, that has highlighted something troubling in Australian intellectual life.
Clive Hamilton paints a picture of China’s unrelenting determination not only to control those within the country, but also to dominate the world using whatever means at its disposal. AAP/Wang Zhou

Book review – Clive Hamilton’s Silent Invasion: China’s Influence in Australia

Clive Hamilton’s book is perhaps a useful reminder that we must not be naïve about our relationship with China, but his prescription is the wrong direction for tackling the genuine issues he raises.

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