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Articles on Climate change education

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Saskatchewan Premier Scott Moe speaks to delegates at the Global Energy Show in Calgary, Alta., June 13, 2023. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Saskatchewan’s new oil and gas high school courses are out of step with global climate action

Instead of training high school students for an industry that the world is transitioning away from, we need education on energy alternatives and ways of addressing climate change impacts.
Refilling a reusable water bottle has become routine for many, and education can inspire similar large-scale behaviour shifts. A water bottle filling station in Glacier National Park in northwestern Montana. (NPS Climate Change Response/Flickr)

Earth Day 2024: ‘Green muscle memory’ and climate education promote behaviour change

Sparking global momentum and energy in young people through climate education can go a long way to addressing climate change now and in the near future.
Wildfire warning signage seen in the Blairmore area, about two hours south of Calgary, Alta., in this handout image provided by the Government of Alberta Fire Service. THE CANADIAN PRESS

Wildfires in Alberta spark urgent school discussions about terrors of global climate futures

School systems need to wake up from ‘business as usual’ learning. Teachers can draw on terror management theory in their work on the front lines with students navigating the climate crisis.
Questions submitted to the Curious Climate Schools project by Margate Primary School students. curiousclimate.org.au/schools

How well does the new Australian Curriculum prepare young people for climate change?

More of the curriculum is devoted to climate change, but it’s still not presented holistically. Teachers also need more training and resources to help them prepare students for a changing climate.
One project with the Art Gallery of Western Australia, researchers and children saw children respond to a painting by Wangkatjunga/Walmajarri artist Ngarralja Tommy May. (Mindy Blaise and Jo Pollitt)

How early childhood education is responding to climate change

Researchers and educators with the Climate Action Childhood network are generating responses to climate change alongside young children.
Northern European folklore had different ways of referring to distant lights known to spontaneously appear on peatlands, including will-o’-the-wisp, and the more familiar jack-o’-lantern. (Shutterstock)

Peatland folklore lent us will-o-the-wisps and jack-o-lanterns, and can inspire climate action today

Peatlands have been central to how northern European folklore has explored fear and a sense of the supernatural for hundreds of years. Their persistence is also key to slowing down climate change.
Cedar Street Elementary School in Beloeil, Que, developed a butterfly and bird perennial garden. Here, a monarch butterfly. (Shutterstock)

School-community gardens plant the seeds of change to address global warming

Picture this change: Through collaborative garden networks, teachers, schools, children, community partners and universities inspire real learning and transformation for a more sustainable world.
Students involved with the Resilient Schools Consortium in New York City quickly grasped the need for climate resiliency in their school buildings. Students from Mark Twain Intermediate School are seen here in October 2017. (Heather Sioux)

Students become school boiler-room sleuths to assess climate change risks

After Hurricane Sandy, educators in New York City partnered with environmental and governmental organizations to put youth at the centre of preparing for risks and hazards in their school buildings.
A electric screen showing Shanghai Pudong financial area in a clear day, is seen amid heavy smog in Shanghai. What can art do to make climate change more real? Aly Song

It’s time for a new age of Enlightenment: why climate change needs 60,000 artists to tell its story

Climate change is such a big problem it’s almost impossible for us to really understand. We need artists to mobilise on a huge scale to render the problem comprehensible.

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