Menu Close

Articles on El Niño Southern Oscillation

Displaying all articles

Southern Africa’s summer rainfall regions currently experiencing the wet-season will likely continue having wetter than normal conditions. SimpleImages/Getty Images

Southern Africa’s summer has been wetter than normal: here’s why

Southern Africa’s current above-average rainfall is a climate variability signal - a short-term fluctuation in average wet-season conditions.
As this reconstructed village shows, Vikings made it as far as Newfoundland during the Medieval warm period. Wikimedia/Dylan Kereluk

Climate explained: what was the Medieval warm period?

During the European Middle Ages, parts of the world experienced warming similar to that between 1960 to 1990. But the rising temperatures we’re observing now are global and exceed the past record.
Shutterstock

One of Australia’s most famous beaches is disappearing, and storms aren’t to blame. So what’s the problem?

Over the past six months, tourists and locals have been shocked to see Byron’s famous Main Beach literally disappearing. Satellite imagery and local knowledge has revealed what’s going on.
Photobank.kiev.ua/Shutterstock

Storm warning: a new long-range tropical cyclone outlook is set to reduce disaster risk for Pacific Island communities

Tropical cyclones account for almost four in five natural disasters across Pacific Island nations. But a new forecasting tool now gives up to four months warning for the upcoming cyclone season.
Australia will probably see fewer tropical cyclones reaching land this season. AAP Image/Bureau of Meteorology

Australia could see fewer cyclones, but more heat and fire risk in coming months

Southern and eastern Australia need to prepare for heatwaves and increased fire risk this summer, as forecasts predict hot, dry weather.
The coral reef of Rarotonga helped scientists create a better climate history. Corey Huber

El Niño has rapidly become stronger and stranger, according to coral records

El Niño events can affect millions of people around the world, causing drought in Australia and floods in the Americas.
Warmer temperatures could lead to more zones of the country that make good breeding sites for mosquitoes. Apichart Meesri / Shutterstock.com

Is climate change causing a rise in the number of mosquito and tick-borne diseases?

Is our changing climate making regions of the US more suitable for ticks and mosquitoes that spread diseases? Or is the climate changing human physiology making us more vulnerable?

Top contributors

More