Menu Close

Articles on Election fraud

Displaying 1 - 20 of 27 articles

Rudy Giuliani, lawyer for President Donald Trump, speaks on Nov. 19 at a news conference about lawsuits related to the presidential election. Sarah Silbiger for The Washington Post via Getty Images

In Trump election fraud cases, federal judges upheld the rule of law – but that’s not enough to fix US politics

President Trump's populist control of his party didn't extend to control in courtrooms where he challenged election results. That's where the rules of politics met the rules of law, and politics lost.
The US Supreme Court in Washington DC. Al Drago/AFP

Fact check US: Could the Supreme Court still save Donald Trump?

Since his election loss, the president has been threatening to go to the Supreme Court in attempt to overturn the results. Unfortunately for him, the court may not be the perfect arbiter of his dreams.
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks with reporters after participating in a video teleconference call with members of the military on Nov. 26, 2020, at the White House in Washington. He reiterated his baseless claims during the news conference that the Nov. 3 election was ‘rigged.’ (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Trump’s lies about the election show how disinformation erodes democracy

If citizens disbelieve the institutions that count ballots and the organizations that accurately report on those results, it will be impossible to agree on what a legitimate election looks like.
Election officials counting ballots at the Allegheny County elections warehouse Friday in Pittsburgh. Jeff Swensen/Getty Images

How votes are counted in Pennsylvania: Changing numbers are a sign of transparency, not fraud, during an ongoing process

As vote counts tick upward, people may have questions about why one candidate does better with mail-in votes or in-person ballots. Here are the answers, and an explanation of how the counting happens.
Mail-in and absentee ballots, like these being processed by election workers in Pennsylvania, are a subject of misinformation spreading across social media. AP Photo/Matt Slocum

5 types of misinformation to watch out for while ballots are being counted – and after

Election misinformation typically involves false narratives of fraud that include out-of-context or otherwise misleading images and faulty statistics as purported evidence.
In Charlotte, North Carolina, officials are preparing the envelopes for the absentee ballot, which will be opened on September 4. Logan Cyrus/AFP

Fact check US: Will mail-in voting result in ‘massive fraud’?

President Trump has repeatedly said that mail-in voting will result in substantial voter fraud. However, the real issues are related to logistics and the support by each state.
Election workers are part of the protections ensuring that mail-in ballots aren’t fraudulent. Will Cioci/Wisconsin Watch via AP

6 ways mail-in ballots are protected from fraud

The mail-in voting process has several built-in safeguards that make it hard for one person to vote fraudulently, and even more difficult to commit large-scale voter fraud.
Protesters against passage of a bill to expand mail-in voting during a Nevada Republican Party demonstration, August 4, 2020, in Las Vegas. Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Mail-in voting does not cause fraud, but judges are buying the GOP’s argument that it does

In lawsuits across the country, the GOP and Trump campaign are trying to stop or dramatically curtail mail-in voting. Courts have largely sided with them, threatening massive disenfranchisement.
Nigeria’s President Muhammadu Buhari at a campaign rally ahead of the 2019 general elections. Stefan Heunis/AFP via Getty Images

Why a rise in court cases is bad for democracy in Nigeria

One year after the 2019 general elections in Nigeria, courts and not the electorate, are busy deciding actual winners of the polls.
Peter Mutharika during his inauguration as the President of Malawi last May. A court has annnulled his election. Amos Gumulira/AFP via Getty Images

Will bold landmark election ruling improve Malawian democracy?

Will the same electoral commission, so heavily criticised in the court’s ruling, improve its capacity and arrange more credible elections?

Top contributors

More