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Articles on Global South

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In this April 2013 photo, Bangladeshis gather as rescuers look for survivors and victims at the site of the Rana Plaza building that collapsed a day earlier, in Savar, Bangladesh. (AP Photo/A.M.Ahad)

Corporate social responsibility commitments: All talk, no action

Until there are global standards for authentic corporate social responsibility efforts, we will continue to see local impoverishment, hazardous waste and tragic labour accidents in the Global South.
Harvesters work on a soybean harvest in the state of Mato Grosso, Brazil. (Pixabay)

Coronavirus: Another chance to transform the global food trade

For the second time this century, crises have led to calls to transform our global food system. We can start with restructuring the global food trade so that it complements local food systems.
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Contextual bias can play out in management studies in both North and South

Academics face the choice of becoming a colony of the Northern mainstream or retreating into a Southern “indigenous” enclave. Both should be resisted.
Julia Aylen wades through waist-deep water carrying her pet dog as she is rescued during Hurricane Dorian in Freeport, Bahamas. AP Photo/Tim Aylen

Climate change, poverty and human rights: an emergency without precedent

The effects of climate change will disproportionately affect the world's poorest, risking the lives and health of millions of people located mainly in the Global South.
A street vendor in Hanoi, Vietnam. Rather than being “helpless and hopeless”, many informal workers are self-reliant and ambitious. Wikimedia

Five myths about the informal economy that need debunking

The informal economy is often perceived negatively, yet recent research from developing and emerging countries indicate that the preconceptions that surround it are myths.
Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda is seen in the courtroom of the International Criminal Court in 2018. (Bas Czerwinski/AP)

By not investigating the U.S. for war crimes, the International Criminal Court shows colonialism still thrives in international law

International law has deep connections to structures of power and inequality. Thankfully, committed jurists like Fatou Bensouda are fighting oppression through their unapologetic acts of resistance.
A French-speaking Canadian volunteer in Haiti part of the volunteer group EDV that helped recovery efforts after the earthquake in early June 2010. Emma Taylor/Wikimedia

How Francophone scholarship deepened our understanding of democracy and social change

Scholars such as Alfred Sauvy, Jean-Pierre Olivier de Sardan and Frantz Fanon wrote in French, but their work greatly contributed to our understanding of democracy and social change in all contexts.
A family from the Central American migrant caravan at the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana. Reuters/Lucy Nicholson

Who is responsible for migrants?

Donald Trump portrays migrants as a foreign problem 'dumped' on America's doorstep. That view ignores the global forces that bind nations together, including trade, climate change and colonization.

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