Global warming

Displaying 1 - 20 of 118 articles

Mountains overlooking the Hex river valley in the Western Cape, South Africa. The country has been experiencing inclement weather this summer. EPA/Nic Bothma

The three culprits behind South Africa’s weird weather patterns

South Africa has been experiencing odd weather patterns during the month of November. It can be attributed to three culprits.
This common lionfish (Pterois volitans) was sighted more than 200km further south than expected down the NSW coast by 14-year-old scuba diver Georgia Poyner. It’s one of almost 40 verified observations she has submitted to Redmap. Redmap/Georgia Poyner

How you can help scientists track how marine life reacts to climate change

We know the warming seas are forcing some marine life to new waters, but we don't know much about how fast and how far they are moving. But now you can help scientists find the answers with Redmap.
Places near the equator, with less natural climate variation, were the first to see humanity’s climate fingerprint. Husond/Wikimedia Commons

Ground zero for climate change: the tropics were first to feel the definite effects in the 1960s

Global warming is, by definition, experienced worldwide. But a new study shows that the tropics were the first places on earth where the human effect on climate outstripped normal climate variations.
Look to the Pacific for reasons behind the hiatus. diversey/flickr

Is the global warming ‘hiatus’ over?

Study of natural variability explains slowdowns in the rate of warming in recent decades – and is key to improving climate models.
Sea level rise is one of the biggest worries of climate change. This image is from the Witness King Tides project, which aims to visualise sea level rise using large tides and storm surges. Witness King Tides/Flickr

How to make sense of ‘alarming’ sea level forecasts

Sea level rise represents one of the most worrying aspects of global warming, potentially displacing millions of people along coasts, low river valleys, deltas and islands.
Piton de la Fournaise or “Peak of the Furnace” on Reunion Island is one of the world’s most active volcanoes, shown erupting in August 2015. AAP/NewZulu/Vincent Dunogué

Explainer: why volcanoes erupt

What happens beneath the surface before a volcano erupts? Can we predict when one will blow? And how can typhoons and melting glaciers contribute to big eruptions?
New data set includes more accurate data from the Arctic, where more warming has occurred. NASA

Improved data set shows no global warming ‘hiatus’

NOAA review reveals that difficult-to-explain slowdown in higher temperatures from global warming was based on faulty data.
A new analysis of historic weather balloon data reveals that the troposphere has been warming as climate models predicted. NOAA/Wikimedia Commons

Climate meme debunked as the ‘tropospheric hot spot’ is found

Climate models have been criticised because observations could not find the predicted "hot spot" of strong warming in the troposphere. But analyses now show that the tropospheric hot spot is indeed real.
Out of sight out of mind? The vast majority of global warming is going into the ocean. peter dondel/Flickr

The climate ‘hiatus’ doesn’t take the heat off global warming

Over the past decade, warming air temperatures at Earth's surface appear to have slowed. But that ignores the vast majority of heat going steadily into the ocean. And, a new paper shows, that makes no difference to the long-term prognosis.
It’s hard to know for sure what role climate change played in the intensity of Cyclone Pam. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

FactCheck: is global warming intensifying cyclones in the Pacific?

A causal relationship between cyclone behaviour and anthropogenic global warming is a very real possibility. But most climate scientists hesitate to attribute any single event to global warming.

Top contributors