Global warming

articles 1 to 20 of 112

Look to the Pacific for reasons behind the hiatus. diversey/flickr

Is the global warming ‘hiatus’ over?

Study of natural variability explains slowdowns in the rate of warming in recent decades – and is key to improving climate models.
Sea level rise is one of the biggest worries of climate change. This image is from the Witness King Tides project, which aims to visualise sea level rise using large tides and storm surges. Witness King Tides/Flickr

How to make sense of ‘alarming’ sea level forecasts

Sea level rise represents one of the most worrying aspects of global warming, potentially displacing millions of people along coasts, low river valleys, deltas and islands.
Piton de la Fournaise or “Peak of the Furnace” on Reunion Island is one of the world’s most active volcanoes, shown erupting in August 2015. AAP/NewZulu/Vincent Dunogué

Explainer: why volcanoes erupt

What happens beneath the surface before a volcano erupts? Can we predict when one will blow? And how can typhoons and melting glaciers contribute to big eruptions?
New data set includes more accurate data from the Arctic, where more warming has occurred. NASA

Improved data set shows no global warming ‘hiatus’

NOAA review reveals that difficult-to-explain slowdown in higher temperatures from global warming was based on faulty data.
A new analysis of historic weather balloon data reveals that the troposphere has been warming as climate models predicted. NOAA/Wikimedia Commons

Climate meme debunked as the ‘tropospheric hot spot’ is found

Climate models have been criticised because observations could not find the predicted "hot spot" of strong warming in the troposphere. But analyses now show that the tropospheric hot spot is indeed real.
Out of sight out of mind? The vast majority of global warming is going into the ocean. peter dondel/Flickr

The climate ‘hiatus’ doesn’t take the heat off global warming

Over the past decade, warming air temperatures at Earth's surface appear to have slowed. But that ignores the vast majority of heat going steadily into the ocean. And, a new paper shows, that makes no difference to the long-term prognosis.
It’s hard to know for sure what role climate change played in the intensity of Cyclone Pam. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

FactCheck: is global warming intensifying cyclones in the Pacific?

A causal relationship between cyclone behaviour and anthropogenic global warming is a very real possibility. But most climate scientists hesitate to attribute any single event to global warming.
Despite adjustments to temperature data in the Arctic, the overall global warming trend remains the same. Flickr/P J Hansen

Global warming trend unaffected by ‘fiddling’ with temperature data

Attacks on institutions that keep records of global temperatures, such as NASA, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the UK Met Office, and Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology, continue…
It’s all in the atmosphere. David Gray/Reuters

What caused the ‘pause’ in global warming?

Many people around the world, in certain locations, have asked, “where is global warming?” This is because they have experienced very cold wintry conditions and weird weather that they do not associate…
Is anyone listening, and does it matter? Adrees Latif/Reuters

Can people power drive action on climate change?

Humans have so much influence over the global environment today that we have crossed a major threshold in Earth’s long history, entering a new stage in geological time which some scientists call the Anthropocene…
A king tide in New Zealand, part of a project documenting what future sea level rise might look like. Witness King Tides/Flickr

15 years from now, our impact on regional sea level will be clear

Human activity is driving sea levels higher. Australia’s seas are likely to rise by around 70 centimetres by 2100 if nothing is done to combat climate change. But 2100 can seem a long way off. At the moment…

Top contributors

More