Global warming

Articles (1 - 20 of 108)

New data set includes more accurate data from the Arctic, where more warming has occurred. NASA

Improved data set shows no global warming ‘hiatus’

NOAA review reveals that difficult-to-explain slowdown in higher temperatures from global warming was based on faulty data.
A new analysis of historic weather balloon data reveals that the troposphere has been warming as climate models predicted. NOAA/Wikimedia Commons

Climate meme debunked as the ‘tropospheric hot spot’ is found

Climate models have been criticised because observations could not find the predicted "hot spot" of strong warming in the troposphere. But analyses now show that the tropospheric hot spot is indeed real.
Out of sight out of mind? The vast majority of global warming is going into the ocean. peter dondel/Flickr

The climate ‘hiatus’ doesn’t take the heat off global warming

Over the past decade, warming air temperatures at Earth's surface appear to have slowed. But that ignores the vast majority of heat going steadily into the ocean. And, a new paper shows, that makes no difference to the long-term prognosis.
It’s hard to know for sure what role climate change played in the intensity of Cyclone Pam. AAP Image/Dave Hunt

FactCheck: is global warming intensifying cyclones in the Pacific?

A causal relationship between cyclone behaviour and anthropogenic global warming is a very real possibility. But most climate scientists hesitate to attribute any single event to global warming.
Despite adjustments to temperature data in the Arctic, the overall global warming trend remains the same. Flickr/P J Hansen

Global warming trend unaffected by ‘fiddling’ with temperature data

Attacks on institutions that keep records of global temperatures, such as NASA, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the UK Met Office, and Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology, continue…
It’s all in the atmosphere. David Gray/Reuters

What caused the ‘pause’ in global warming?

Many people around the world, in certain locations, have asked, “where is global warming?” This is because they have experienced very cold wintry conditions and weird weather that they do not associate…
Is anyone listening, and does it matter? Adrees Latif/Reuters

Can people power drive action on climate change?

Humans have so much influence over the global environment today that we have crossed a major threshold in Earth’s long history, entering a new stage in geological time which some scientists call the Anthropocene…
A king tide in New Zealand, part of a project documenting what future sea level rise might look like. Witness King Tides/Flickr

15 years from now, our impact on regional sea level will be clear

Human activity is driving sea levels higher. Australia’s seas are likely to rise by around 70 centimetres by 2100 if nothing is done to combat climate change. But 2100 can seem a long way off. At the moment…
The need for caution when any anomaly is revealed in new research. Flickr/Adam Gerard

How myths and tabloids feed on anomalies in science

UNDERSTANDING RESEARCH: What do we actually mean by research and how does it help inform our understanding of things? What if research throws up a result that calls for a new way of thinking? How do we…
Carbon emissions from burning fossil fuels and cement-making reached 36 billion tonnes in 2013. Shutterstock

Mapping global carbon emissions

The latest report on global carbon emissions released this week revealed that carbon dioxide emissions will likely reach 40 billion tonnes this year. Growth in emissions continues to match the worst-case…
A new study finds overwhelming odds that humans have contributed to higher global temperatures – so how much are we willing to gamble that it’s wrong? Kraevski Vitaly/Shutterstock

99.999% certainty humans are driving global warming: new study

There is less than 1 chance in 100,000 that global average temperature over the past 60 years would have been as high without human-caused greenhouse gas emissions, our new research shows. Published in…
Tasman Lake, which is fed by melt water from the retreating Tasman Glacier, photographed in March this year. Trevor Chinn

New Zealand’s Southern Alps have lost a third of their ice

A third of the permanent snow and ice of New Zealand’s Southern Alps has now disappeared, according to our new research based on National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research aerial surveys. Since…

Top contributors

More