Articles on heatwaves

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A woman cools down in a water fountain as she beats the heat in Montreal on Monday, July 2, 2018. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Climate change can be deadly if you live alone

Heatwave deaths this summer make it clear: climate change is a severe public health threat, and those who live alone are at greatest risk.
‘Soft fall’ surfaces are widely used in play areas where children might fall, but can also get very hot in the sun, which undermines this safety benefit. Brisbane City Council/Flickr

Materials that make heat worse for our kids demand a rethink by designers

Commonly used surfaces in play areas, such as "soft fall" materials and Astroturf, can heat up to 80-100°C in the sun. This makes them a hazardous design choice, especially as the climate gets hotter.
Extreme temperatures in Cordoba, Spain in June 2017. EPA/SALAS

Why hot weather records continue to tumble worldwide

In an unchanging climate, we would expect record-breaking temperatures to get rarer as the observation record grows longer. But in the real world the opposite is true - because we are driving up temperatures.
Soaring heating costs mean many vulnerable Australians endure cold houses and the associated risks to their health. Paul Vasarhelyi from www.shutterstock.com

Forget heatwaves, our cold houses are much more likely to kill us

The idea of a hot and sunny land is so baked into our thinking about Australia that we've failed to design and build houses that protect us from the cold.
Nowhere to hide? With 2℃ of global warming, the stifling heat of January 2013 would be the norm for Australia. AAP Image/Dean Lewins

Why 2℃ of global warming is much worse for Australia than 1.5℃

Global warming of 2℃, the higher of the two Paris targets, would see current record-breaking temperatures become the norm in the future, potentially bringing heatwaves to both land and sea.
Climate change can cause higher pollen counts. Lukasz Szmigiel/Unsplash

Can we blame climate change for thunderstorm asthma?

Irrespective of whether climate change contributed to the thunderstorm in Melbourne last week, we can be sure Australia’s climate projections herald new risks to health that cannot be ignored.

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