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Articles on Hoaxes

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Amid the COVID-19 pandemic, Southeast Asian governments not only have to deal with the virus but also with the false information surrounding it.

Three fact-checking challenges in Southeast Asia

With a limited number of fact-checkers in Southeast Asia, fact-checking content becomes a challenging task to complete.
People display Qanon messages on cardboards during a political rally in Bucharest, Romania on Aug. 10, 2020. (Shutterstock)

Folk devils and fear: QAnon feeds into a culture of moral panic

The QAnon conspiracy movement is the latest in a long line of moral panics that emerge as a response to change. False theories are used to undermine claims to social justice raised by marginalized groups.
A sign outside Lions Gate Hospital in North Vancouver, B.C., explains visitor restrictions to limit the spread of the novel coronavirus COVID-19. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Conspiracy theorists are falsely claiming that the coronavirus pandemic is an elaborate hoax

Hospitals have requested that people avoid non-emergency visits, and conspiracy theorists are posting images of empty parking lots online as false proof that COVID-19 is an elaborate hoax.
FOX News host Sean Hannity (pictured here in 2018) gave credibility to a tweet he read out lout on his popular syndicated radio show, which called COVID-19 a fraud “to spread panic in the populace, manipulate the economy and suppress dissent.” AP/Julie Jacobson

Coronavirus ‘cures’ for $170 and other hoaxes: Why some people believe them

Why have conspiracy theories so easily circulated during the COVID-19 pandemic? What do these theories tell us about societies and what challenges do they present?
Families should be more involved in digital literacy education as parents are the ones who introduce digital media to their children. Shutterstock.com

Researchers find Indonesia needs more digital literacy education

Dozens of voluntary researchers in nine Indonesian cities mapped digital literacy activities and they found the country needs much more to solve their digital media problems.
Traditional media gatekeepers are toast. 'Toaster' via www.shutterstock.com

Why do we fall for fake news?

Researcher who has studied online news for 20 years says people fall for fake news because they don't value journalistic sources and consider themselves and their friends as credible news sources.
Sharing election hashtags: Dots are Twitter accounts; lines show retweeting; larger dots are retweeted more. Red dots are likely bots; blue ones are likely humans. Clayton Davis

Misinformation on social media: Can technology save us?

If people can be conned into jeopardizing our children's lives, as they do when they opt out of immunizations, could they also be conned out of democracy?
Cleverly doctored images of the effects of Sydney’s April storms amused social media users – but hoax images have a much longer history. Todd Lopez/@Creative_Order

From epic storm pics to fairies in the garden, be careful with images

The adage that the camera doesn't lie is, of course, a lie, as a long history of hoaxes amply demonstrates. And yet we can still be duped by tricksters. We should remain vigilant.
It’s got truth serum in it? PA

Hoax calls to the PM are the price we pay for democracy

The ease with which a hoaxer was recently able to call the prime minister’s mobile phone, pretending to be the head of GCHQ, highlights a major dilemma for democratic political leaders. Cameron said he…

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