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Articles on Humanitarian aid

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Humanitarian agencies are often thrust into the heart of contentious crises without easy or quick solutions. The Houthis accused the WFP of giving out expired food assistance. The UN agency delivers monthly rations or money to 10.2 million people of Yemen's 26-million population. EPA-EFE/YAHYA ARHAB

Comply or leave: the dilemma facing humanitarian agencies

When humanitarian agencies are obliged to stop operations by political decision or because of huge physical insecurity, the poorest and most vulnerable succumb first through starvation and disease.
Venezuelans wait at the Colombian border to be processed and housed in tents in 2020. All Venezuelans now in Colombia will receive a 10-year residency permit. Schneyder Mendoza/AFP via Getty Images

Colombia gives nearly 1 million Venezuelan migrants legal status and right to work

Though not a rich country, Colombia is unusually well equipped to handle mass migration because of its own history with political strife and displacement.
Ethiopian refugees, who fled fighting in Tigray, receive snacks at a Sudanese border reception centre in November 2020. Photo by ASHRAF SHAZLY/AFP via Getty Images

The legal implications of humanitarian aid blockades

If a country refuses, or blocks, humanitarian aid this act violates international law.
Demonstration in Montecitorio Square, Rome, Italy, on November 12, 2020 calling for the end of the government’s military actions in the northern region of Tigray. Photo by Andrea Ronchini/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Did Ethiopia’s attack on Tigray violate international laws?

Providers of humanitarian aid haven’t been able to reach civilians in Ethiopia’s Tigray region. There are also reports that hundreds of civilians have been killed.
Non-profit organisation Nakhlistan and Mustadafin Foundation prepares food for underprivileged communities across the Western Cape. Photo by Brenton Geach/Gallo Images via Getty Images

Civil society groups that mobilised around COVID-19 face important choices

Civil society activists responding to the COVID-19 social crisis face important challenges and tensions. They should tackle these choices head-on as they develop longer-term plans.
Residents of Cagayan de Oro survey what’s left of their homes the day after Typhoon Washi hit the Philippines in 2011.

Rebuilding from disaster: it doesn’t end when housing aid projects finish

Months after Typhoon Washi tore through the Philippines in 2011, relocated residents were moving into newly built housing. They soon began modifying and extending homes that didn’t meet their needs.
U.S. Air Force troops erected a temporary hospital in Liberia in 2014 to help fight an Ebola outbreak. John Moore/Getty Images

How the US military could help fight the coronavirus outbreak

There is plenty the military could do to help protect public health, such as by helping with supply logistics and providing workers to do important tasks – including health care professionals.
Venezuelans hoping to cross into Ecuador via Colombia amass at the Rumichaca border bridge in Tulcan, Ecuador, as new visa restrictions limiting migration took effect, Aug. 26, 2019. Reuters/Daniel Tapia

Latin America shuts out desperate Venezuelans but Colombia’s border remains open – for now

Citing national security, Ecuador, Peru and Chile have all made it harder for Venezuelan migrants to enter the country, and xenophobia is rising across the region – even in more welcoming Colombia.
Red Cross forensic specialist Stephen Fonseca, right, searches for bodies in a field of ruined maize in Magaru, Mozambique, after Cyclone Idai, April 4, 2019. AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi

Humanitarian forensic scientists trace the missing, identify the dead and comfort the living

Meet the unsung aid workers who put their lives on the line during war and natural disaster to make sure the dead are treated with respect – and that their grieving families get closure.

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