Articles on Hurricanes

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A Monmouth County, N.J. home in 2015. Jack L. Harris

It takes years to fully recover from big storms like Sandy

Getting everyone whose lives were thrown off-track back takes a lot of personal effort, paired with work done by a constantly shifting mix of nonprofits and governmental agencies over many years.
Debris in a boatyard in Mexico Beach, Fla., on Oct. 11, 2018, after Hurricane Michael heavily damaged the town. AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File

Getting ready for hurricane season: 4 essential reads

For the start of Atlantic hurricane season on June 1, scholars explain weather forecasting, evacuation orders, inland flooding risks and how social ties influence decisions to stay or flee.
Flood waters cover large tracts of land in Mozambique after cyclone Idai made landfall. Rapidly rising floodwaters have cut off thousands of families from aid organizations. (World Food Programme via AP)

Hurricanes to deliver a bigger punch to coasts

Climate change is making hurricanes more destructive, and may have boosted the intensity of cyclone Idai that hit Mozambique, Zambia and Malawi.
Devastation from Hurricane Michael in Mexico Beach, Florida, Oct. 12, 2018. Residents whose homes have suffered major damage in multiple storms could eventually be offered buyouts, but the process can take several years. AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

Government-funded buyouts after disasters are slow and inequitable – here’s how that could change

Government agencies spend millions of dollars yearly to buy and demolish homes sited in floodplains. But the program is slow, cumbersome and doesn't always help those who need it most.
Hog farm buildings are inundated with floodwater from Hurricane Florence near Trenton, N.C., in September 2018. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Hurricanes, hog manure and the dire need for carbon pricing

Cheap fossil fuels contort the global economy in ways that have systematically harmed some and benefited others. Justice demands that those of us who have benefited take responsibility.
Would these power lines have weathered the storm if they were underground? Reuters/Jonathan Bachman

Why doesn’t the U.S. bury its power lines?

Hurricanes Michael and Florence have knocked power out for millions of people. Burying power lines could help but the costs are high.
Protecting coastal wetlands, like this slough in Florida’s Everglades National Park, is a cost-effective way to reduce flooding and storm damage. NPS/C. Rivas

Protecting wetlands helps communities reduce damage from hurricanes and storms

Coastal development is destroying marshes, mangroves and other wetlands that provide valuable protection from hurricanes and storms. Research shows these benefits can be worth millions of dollars.
A man tries to get his dog out of a flooded neighbourhood in Lumberton, N.C., in September 2018 in the aftermath of hurricane Florence. Many people opted to ignore evacuation warnings, suggesting a distrust of authorities. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome)

Developing trust after disasters – and every day

A peaceful society requires us to trust our public institutions, but in order to do so, we must question them. Questions are a healthy and necessary response to a world filled with uncertainty.

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