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Articles on Hurricanes

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La Niña typically means cooler, wetter conditions on average globally, but not everywhere, and not every time. Luis Robayo/AFP via Getty Images

La Niña is coming, raising the chances of a dangerous Atlantic hurricane season – an atmospheric scientist explains this climate phenomenon

After a year of record-breaking global heat with El Niño, will La Niña bring a reprieve? That depends on where you live and how you feel about hurricanes.
Hurricane Lee became the busy 2023 hurricane season’s first Category 5 storm and one of the most intense hurricanes on record in the Atlantic Ocean. (NOAA via AP)

Hurricane Lee: How studying hurricane Fiona’s legacy in Atlantic Canada can help us better prepare for future storms

Can Hurricane Fiona give us a hint about what future climate change might bring to Eastern Canada? Unravelling this question could lie in understanding ancient storm records.
Destroyed homes and buildings in Lahaina on Aug. 10, 2023, in the aftermath of wildfires on western Maui, Hawaii. Patrick T. Fallon / AFP via Getty Images

Wildfires are a severe blow to Maui’s tourism-based economy, but other iconic destinations have come back from similar disasters

Wildfires on Maui are a crippling blow to the island’s tourism industry, which generates half of its jobs. But New Orleans and Kauai show that comebacks are possible.
Damaged buildings sit in the water along the shore following Hurricane Fiona in Rose Blanche-Harbour Le Cou, N.L. in September, 2022. Fiona left a trail of destruction across much of Atlantic Canada. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Canadians are unprepared for natural hazards. Here’s what we can do about it

As extreme weather events increase in frequency and severity, many Canadians are still unaware of how to prepare for a natural disaster.
NASA

In the future, we could snuff out cyclones. But weather control comes with new risks

It may soon be possible to reduce cyclone formation and intensity by spraying particles into the atmosphere above a forming storm. But the technology opens up a can of worms
The idea that the Coriolis force influences how water drains frequently appears in popular culture and urban legends. frantic00 / Shutterstock

Does the direction water rotates down the drain depend on which hemisphere you’re in? Debunking the Coriolis effect in your sink

This physical effect does explain how some massive natural phenomena like hurricanes behave. But on the scale of water in your sink – not so much.

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