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Articles on Inequity

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‘Cancer Alley’ is an 80-mile stretch of chemical plants along the Mississippi River in Louisiana alongside many Black and poor communities. Giles Clarke/Getty Images

Biden has pledged to advance environmental justice – here’s how the EPA can start

The US environmental justice movement dates back to the early 1980s, but federal support for it has been weak and inconsistent. Here are four things Biden's EPA can do to improve that record.
Far from saving for a rainy day, governments are seriously indebting our children and future generations due to profligate overspending. Ben Wicks/Unsplash

Huge government debts mean Canada is robbing its kids

Canadian governments are failing to treat future citizens fairly by saddling them with huge debt. What policies should Canadian governments enact that offer greater fairness to future generations?
A young child stands outside the entrance to a playground in Montréal on May 3, 2020, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes

Returning to ‘normal’ post-coronavirus would be inhumane

The coronavirus feeds off of social and environmental injustice, exacerbating the wounds, scars and illnesses that existed prior to the pandemic. That's why returning to 'normal' is not an option.
Elementary school student Adrian Zak works with his teacher online in Vienna, Austria, March 25, 2020. The Austrian government has restricted freedom of movement for people in an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. AP Photo/Ronald Zak

Coronavirus isn’t the end of ‘childhood innocence,’ but an opportunity to rethink children’s rights

These are difficult and dire times, but holding on to the myth of childhood innocence won't make this crisis any easier.
Ontario Minister of Education Stephen Lecce arrives at a press conference to announce a tentative deal reached with CUPE in Toronto on Oct. 6, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Cole Burston

What striking education workers and climate activists have in common

Frustration at intergenerational inequity captures the views of many contemporary education worker activists and environmentalists alike.
Parents who raise money and decide how to spend it influence resources and opportunities available to schools in ways that reflect their own interests. (Shutterstock)

The fun fair, and all school fundraising, may carry hidden costs to society

School fundraising, while often heralded for increasing parent engagement and providing much-needed school resources, may come at the expense of creating of equitable and inclusive public schools.
Living in an urban centre is no guarantee for new NBN technology. from www.shutterstock.com

Around 50% of homes in Sydney, Melbourne and Brisbane have the oldest NBN technology

Around half of homes in three major Australian cities only have access to very old technology: hybrid fibre-coaxial (HFC). For them, access to the NBN fibre network remains only a fairy tale.
Devastation from Hurricane Michael in Mexico Beach, Florida, Oct. 12, 2018. Residents whose homes have suffered major damage in multiple storms could eventually be offered buyouts, but the process can take several years. AP Photo/Gerald Herbert

Government-funded buyouts after disasters are slow and inequitable – here’s how that could change

Government agencies spend millions of dollars yearly to buy and demolish homes sited in floodplains. But the program is slow, cumbersome and doesn't always help those who need it most.
The HECS system is a hybrid policy approach that ensures Australian universities remain accessible while funding remains sustainable. Dean Lewins/AAP

Market v government? In fact, hybrid policy is the best fit for the 21st century

From the 20th-century process of policy trial and error, the nations that married the strengths of markets and government came out ahead.
People are alarmed about Airbnb’s impacts, but these are far from uniform across the city. Justin Lane/EPA

Airbnb: who’s in, who’s out, and what this tells us about rental impacts in Sydney and Melbourne

The patterns of Airbnb listings in Australia's biggest cities suggest impacts on rental housing are likely to be biggest in high-end areas that appeal to tourists. Low-income areas are less affected.
We need to look behind the sharing economy’s apparently informal, casual intent to consider the impacts on people’s lives. Montri Nipitvittaya/Shutterstock

Sharing economy sounds caring, but let’s put it to the ethical city test

In cities dominated by globalised market forces, how can we achieve social equity and justice? For any sharing economy idea, we need to ask what will it do to fix the big problems confronting us all.

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