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Articles on John A. Macdonald

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Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau speaks during a dramatic meeting with the entire federal cabinet and a delegation of about 200 First Nations leaders on Parliament Hill in Ottawa in 1970. THE CANADIAN PRESS/R. Mac

Pierre Trudeau’s failures on Indigenous rights tarnish his legacy

How did a national leader whose animating political spirit was protecting human rights come to adopt a passive acceptance of Canada's worst face of colonialism?
Historians’ work looks like meaningful disagreements around how to grapple with an ambiguous, complicated past. Here, ‘Pi’ sculpture by Evan Grant Penny, Wellington St., Toronto. (Brendan Lynch/Flickr)

Don’t despair if your teen wants to major in history instead of science

Put down the science brochures. If your high schooler really wants to be a history major, smile, knowing that they’re taking the first step to a deeper understanding of the world around them.
The decision by the city of Victoria to take down a statue of John A. Macdonald has renewed debate about how historical figures should be remembered. This photo from 2015, taken at Wilfrid Laurier University, shows people protesting Macdonald’s treatment of Métis and First Nations during his time as Canada’s first prime minister. Denia Anderson

John A. Macdonald should not be forgotten, nor celebrated

Should statues of historical figures be removed or replaced? That debate has been rekindled in Canada after Victoria took down a statue of John A. Macdonald, the country's first prime minister.

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