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Articles on statues

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A man hangs a protest banner where the Egerton Ryerson statue used to sit at Ryerson University. The statue was toppled in June by those protesting the discovery of graves at Indian Residential Schools. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn

Suburban monumentalism: How do we change Indigenous-settler relations when there are no statues to destroy?

The suburban-built environment whitewashes the violence and theft on which Canada is built.
St Kitts-born Archibald Burt pictured beside sugar cane growing in his Perth garden in 1862. Burt, a former slave owner, became chief justice of Western Australia. State Library of Western Australia 6923B/182

Friday essay: beyond ‘statue shaming’ — grappling with Australia’s legacies of slavery

When Britain legislated to abolish slavery in 1833, some former slave owners moved to the Australasian colonies. New research traces this movement of people, money and ideologies.
Workers lower a a statue of Canada’s first prime minister, John A. Macdonald, onto a truck as a crowd watches in Kingston, Ont., June 18, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Lars Hagberg

Commemoration controversies in classrooms: Canadian history teachers disagree about making ethical judgments

A survey of history teachers in Canada showed the prevalence of the myth of objectivity among history teachers.
Protestors toppled a statue of Sir John A. Macdonald after a demonstration in Montréal on Aug. 29, 2020. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes)

Education and democracy can help address monuments that are a reminder of racist pasts

Contending with Canada’s history means acknowledging different versions of the truth. Toppling statues won’t resolve the wrongs of the past — education is an important part of democracy and inclusion.
As statues topple, business schools must begin seriously decolonizing. (Piqsels)

A call to decolonize business schools, including our own

Contemplating the future of the business school means we must decide what kind of society we want our students to create and what reforms are needed to enable them to do so.
Artist Joi T. Arcand explains ‘Never Surrender,’ ‘translates a …1980s Canadian pop song into the Cree language and recontextualiz[es] the lyrics as an anthem of Indigenous sovereignty.’ Here, the image layered over a photo of a Winnipeg sidewalk. (Noor)

Nuit Blanche Toronto goes virtual to change how people see art and public space

Both the COVID-19 pandemic and urgent debates around public heritage and monuments shape how Nuit Blanche Toronto is seeking to engage artists and viewers in remapping cities.
Australia’s move to increase fees for some university humanities courses reflects global trends towards market-friendly education that overlook what’s needed for human flourishing. Here, the University of Sydney. (Eriksson Luo/Unsplash)

Stop telling students to study STEM instead of humanities for the post-coronavirus world

Today’s urgent inequality and environmental crises mean that more, not fewer, students should be studying history.

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