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Articles on Land management

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IMG. Photo credit: Wolfram Dressler

Indigenous knowledge and the persistence of the ‘wilderness’ myth

Aboriginal people view so-called wilderness as sick, neglected land. This runs counter to the view of wilderness as pristine and healthy, which underpins non-Indigenous conservation efforts.
Waters from the Herbert River, which runs toward one of northern Australia’s richest agricultural districts, could be redirected under a Bradfield scheme. Patrick White

‘New Bradfield’: rerouting rivers to recapture a pioneering spirit

The ‘New Bradfield’ scheme seeks to revive a nation-building ethos supposedly stifled by bureaucratic inertia. But there are good reasons the scheme never became a reality.
Aja Conrad, the Karuk Tribe’s workforce and internships coordinator, lights a prescribed fire in Orleans, California. Jenny Staats

What western states can learn from Native American wildfire management strategies

Instead of suppressing wildfire, the Karuk Tribe in the Pacific Northwest is using it as an integral part of its climate change management plan. Federal, state and local agencies are taking note.
Aborigines Using Fire to Hunt Kangaroos, by Joseph Lycett. New research suggests the assumption Aboriginal people lived in open vegetation sustained by fire is misplaced. National Library of Australia

New research turns Tasmanian Aboriginal history on its head. The results will help care for the land

History has told us Aboriginal people in Tasmania almost exclusively occupied open plains. Revelations to the contrary could transform modern conservation.
No-till farming conserves soil by greatly reducing erosion. USDA NRCS South Dakota/Eric Barsness

Restoring soil can help address climate change

More than one-fifth of global warming emissions come from land use. Sustainable farming can make soil healthier and better able to soak up carbon, while saving energy and boosting food production.
Many farmers are now facing a future in which it is much harder to make a living off the land. AAP Image/Dan Peled

Farmers’ climate denial begins to wane as reality bites

A decade ago, only a third of farmers accepted the science of climate change. But surveys show attitudes have shifted in recent years as the farming community begins to confront what the future holds.
Maasai women on a conservation project in Kenya. Joan de la Malla

Indigenous peoples are crucial for conservation – a quarter of all land is in their hands

A new map shows that more than 25% of all land outside Antarctica is held and managed by Indigenous peoples. This makes these communities vital allies in the global conservation effort.
A ‘thinned’ landscape, which provides far from ideal habitat for many species.

Land clearing on the rise as legal ‘thinning’ proves far from clear-cut

Legal vegetation ‘thinning’ is contributing to high rates of land clearing, potentially causing problems for threatened species and ecosystems.
The sun rises above Uluru in outback Australia. David Gray/Reuters

We need our country; our country needs us

‘Australian values’ have been mangled into meaninglessness by countless politicians. But there is an national character, shaped by the Australian land. New research investigates Outback values.
Tony Abbott launched the Green Army program, and remains a big fan. AAP Image/Britta Campion

Why give the Green Army its marching orders?

The possible axing of the Green Army, which aimed to put thousands to work tending conservation projects, leaves many questions unanswered - the biggest being the reason for the sudden retreat.

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