Menu Close

Articles on Longreads

Displaying 1 - 20 of 26 articles

In a 1949 photograph, Mori works in his family’s nursery in San Leandro, Calif. Courtesy of Steven Y. Mori

Toshio Mori endured internment camps and overcame discrimination to become the first Japanese American to publish a book of fiction

On Dec. 2, 1941, a publication date was set for Mori’s first book. Five days later, the Japanese bombed Pearl Harbor, upending the writer’s life and throwing the book’s publication into doubt.
Why did she do all the work while Santa got all the glory? What would happen if she delivered the toys? Joe Sohm/Visions of America/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

How Mrs. Claus embodied 19th-century debates about women’s rights

Many early stories praise her work ethic and devotion. But with Mrs. Claus usually hitting the North Pole’s glass ceiling, some writers started to push back.
When asked how she wanted to be remembered, Tammy Faye replied, “My eyelashes and my walk with the Lord.” John Storey/Getty Images

Underneath all the makeup, who was the real Tammy Faye?

The subject of a new biopic, Tammy Faye was a televangelist icon. But she also represented another side of the evangelical coin – one that was big-hearted, vulnerable and accepting.
Companies could soon tailor what they try to sell you based on the mood conveyed by the sound of your voice. CSA-Printstock via Getty Images

Shhhh, they’re listening – inside the coming voice-profiling revolution

Marketers will soon be able to use AI-assisted vocal analysis to gain insights into shoppers’ inclinations – without people knowing what they’re revealing or how that information is being interpreted.
Japanese author Yukio Mishima speaks to Japanese Self-Defense Force soldiers at Tokyo’s military garrison station on Nov. 25, 1970. JIJI PRESS/AFP via Getty Images

Japan’s most famous writer committed suicide after a failed coup attempt – now, new photos add more layers to the haunting act

Like a Rorschach test, the incident offers limitless interpretations. But newly published photographs of Yukio Mishima in his final weeks alive show an artist obsessed with scripting out death.
Specimens in herbaria include “pickled” plants in pots (shown here), dried specimens and fruits or seeds preserved whole. Ainsley Calladine, State Herbarium of South Australia

From Joseph Banks to big data, herbaria bring centuries-old science into the digital age

Australia’s herbaria are a priceless repository, holding around 8 million samples that map historical and current distributions of native and introduced plant species in Australia.

Top contributors

More