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Articles on Monkeys

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Rhesus macaques experience an aging process similar to people’s. Goddard Photography/E+ via Getty Images

Expanding Alzheimer’s research with primates could overcome the problem with treatments that show promise in mice but don’t help humans

Nonhuman primates like rhesus monkeys share certain characteristics with people that may make them better study subjects than mice for research on neurodegenerative diseases.
New research indicates that rhesus monkeys show interoception – the ability to sense physiological processes like their own heartbeats. Matthew Verdolivo/UC Davis IET Academic Technology Services

Monkeys can sense their own heartbeats, an ability tied to mental health, consciousness and memory in humans

Researchers used a test designed for babies to show that rhesus monkeys can sense their own heartbeats. The finding opens up important paths of research into consciousness and mental health issues.
The estimated lifetime costs of antiretroviral therapy for someone who acquires HIV at age 35 is $358,380. YakubovAlim/iStock via Getty Images Plus

Combining an HIV vaccine with immunotherapy may reduce the need for daily medication

People with HIV need to take daily medication to keep the virus at bay. A study has found that a new treatment combination could boost immunity and control virus levels even after stopping medication.
Researchers have grown mammal embryos later into development than ever before in an artificial womb. Vitalii Kyryk/WikimediaCommons

Lab–grown embryos and human–monkey hybrids: Medical marvels or ethical missteps?

Researchers have grown the first human-monkey hybrid embryos as well as mouse embryos in artificial wombs late into development. These biomedical breakthroughs raise different ethical quandaries.
Pangolins have been found with covonaviruses that are genetically similar to the one afflicting humans today. Jekesai Njikizana/AFP/Getty Images

How deforestation helps deadly viruses jump from animals to humans

Yellow fever, malaria and Ebola all spilled over from animals to humans at the edges of tropical forests. The new coronavirus is the latest zoonosis.

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