Menu Close

Articles on Polarization

Displaying 1 - 20 of 42 articles

Joe Biden and Donald Trump supporters, like these two, are more likely to be polarized by TV news than online echo chambers. AP Photo/Allen G. Breed

Don’t be too quick to blame social media for America’s polarization – cable news has a bigger effect, study finds

Studies of online echo chambers don’t paint the full picture of Americans’ political segregation. New research shows that the problem is more Fox News Channel and MSNBC than Facebook and Twitter.
The Department of Justice indicted six officers of Russia’s GRU military intelligence service in October 2020 on charges of hacking and deploying malware. Andrew Harnik - Pool/Getty Images

Russia could unleash disruptive cyberattacks against the US – but efforts to sow confusion and division are more likely

Russia probably has the means to attack US electrical grids and otherwise create havoc but probably won’t go that far. Instead, watch for disinformation aimed at undermining the US and NATO.
Protesters and counter-protesters face off at a political rally in September 2021. AP Photo/Nathan Howard

Not all polarization is bad, but the US could be in trouble

Deep-seated disagreement is healthy for a democracy. But when people lose the ability to navigate those differences, they risk seeking anti-democratic unity of thought.
A cutout display at a protest highlighted the connection between social media and the real-world effects of misinformation. Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. via Getty Images

What will 2022 bring in the way of misinformation on social media? 3 experts weigh in

Misinformation will continue to strain society in 2022 as the lines between misinformation and political speech blur, cynicism grows and the lack of regulation allows misinformation to flourish.
Agreeing to disagree? Showing empathy or compassion about why someone holds opinions very different from yours can help defuse polarization. (Liza Summer/Pexels)

How to function in an increasingly polarized society

How to manage the stress of polarization and how to function when it surrounds us is now a necessary but underdeveloped skill for many of us.
Opinion journalism can rile people up – or it can bring them together. momentimages/Getty Images

Local newspapers can help reduce polarization with opinion pages that focus on local issues

The best op-ed pages operate like a town square, allowing readers to discuss and debate issues important to their communities and beyond. But many now focus on divisive national political issues.
Laws and policy are being made in Washington – both inside Congress and out. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

Debunking the myth of legislative gridlock

The idea that Washington, DC is paralyzed by gridlock rests on half-truths about the legislative process and a basic misunderstanding of how contemporary policymaking works.
As vice president, Joe Biden – seen here on left, in 2016 – had a working relationship with the Republican Senate majority leader, Mitch McConnell. Is that possible now? Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Foreign policy is Biden’s best bet for bipartisan action, experts say – but GOP is unlikely to join him on climate change

A survey of 800 foreign policy experts identified four international issues where Republicans and Democrats may actually cooperate to get something done – and one area of severe disagreement.
U.S. President Donald Trump removes his mask as he stands on the Blue Room Balcony upon returning to the White House Monday, Oct. 5, 2020, in Washington, after spending time in hospital with a COVID-19 infection. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

How COVID-19 led to Donald Trump’s defeat

New research suggests that if Donald Trump had handled the COVID-19 pandemic better and kept outbreaks under control, he might have won the Nov. 3 election.
A woman views a manipulated video that changes what is said by President Donald Trump and former President Barack Obama. ROB LEVER/AFP via Getty Images

3 reasons for information exhaustion – and what to do about it

A philosopher writes about why many of us are feeling tired with the constant onslaught of information coming at us.
Talking politics increasingly seems like an exercise in talking past one another. GeorgePeters/Getty Images

Fox News viewers write about ‘BLM’ the same way CNN viewers write about ‘KKK’

Using machine learning to study over 85 million YouTube comments, a research team has, for the first time, identified linguistic differences among cable news viewers.
Richard Nixon, celebrating his election on Nov. 7, 1968, campaigned against a backdrop of racial inequality, civic unrest and polarized politics. AFP via Getty Images

1968’s presidential election looks a lot like today’s – but it was very different

There are similarities between the law-and-order language used by the 1968 and 2020 presidential candidates and the racial tension and political polarization both years. But much is different.
Both Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi and U.S. President Donald Trump have been accused of using hate speech. AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi

When politicians use hate speech, political violence increases

My research shows that when politicians use hate speech, it’s not just empty rhetoric or political theater: Domestic terrorism increases, in the US and in other countries.
Demonstrators outside the U.S. Capitol on Sept. 21 called on the Republican-controlled Senate not to confirm a new justice until the next president is in office. Alex Edelman/AFP via Getty Images

Unlike US, Europe picks top judges with bipartisan approval to create ideologically balanced high courts

The Supreme Court doesn’t have to be so polarized. Many European countries make judicial appointments in a term-limited, intentionally depoliticized way to promote consensus and compromise.

Top contributors

More