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Articles on Sepsis

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Sepsis begins with infection by bacteria or a virus. This panoramic ilustration inside a blood vessel shows rod-shaped bacteria, red blood cells and immune cells called leukocytes. Kateryna Kon/Science Photo Library via Getty Images

Sepsis still kills 1 in 5 people worldwide – two ICU physicians offer a new approach to stopping it

Sepsis onset can be difficult to recognize, in part because its symptoms can mimic those of many other conditions. A treatment delay of even a few hours can make the difference between life and death.
Penicillin ushered in the antibiotics revolution, with amazing results during war and peace. Science & Society Picture Library/SSPL via Getty Images

Guns, not roses – here’s the true story of penicillin’s first patient

Albert Alexander was the first known person treated with penicillin. While his ultimately fatal case is well known in medical histories, the cause of his illness has been misattributed for decades.
At least 5,000 Australians die each year as a result of sepsis, more commonly known as blood poisoning. From shutterstock.com

What is sepsis and how can it be treated?

With an ageing population, and the growing threat of antibiotic resistance, now is the time to be worried about sepsis.
Drips and other medical devices were potential sources of infection. But no-one expected to find hospital-acquired pneumonia and urinary tract infections. from www.shutterstock.com

1 in 10 patients are infected in hospital, and it’s not always with what you think

A surprising number of people are catching pneumonia or urinary tract infections in hospital, a new Australian study shows for the first time.
Former Presidents George W. Bush and George H.W. Bush attend Barbara Bush’s funeral service. AP Photo/David J. Phillip

George H. W. Bush has sepsis - why is it so dangerous?

Former President George H.W. Bush was hospitalized for sepsis, which can be serious. Just what is this disease that accounts for one-third of all hospital deaths? A speed read explains the dangers.
Drug-resistant strains of gonorrhoea, once easily dispatched with penicillin, are spreading across the globe resulting in chronic pain and sterility. (Shutterstock)

Canada could lead the fight for life in a post-antibiotic world

Without leading edge innovations and coordination, Canadians will die from the epidemic of antibiotic resistant infections.
The authors say their findings raise important questions about the central role of animal models in biomedical research. Understanding Animal Research

Of mice and men: role of mice in biomedical research questioned

A study recently published in the peer-reviewed journal PNAS (Proceedings of the National of Academy Sciences) shows that mice are poor models for human inflammatory diseases. The paper, which focused…

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